UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, DC 20549
FORM 10-K
þ ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2014
 ¨ TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
Commission File Number 1-2958
 
HUBBELL INCORPORATED
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)
STATE OF CONNECTICUT
06-0397030
(State or other jurisdiction of incorporation or organization)
(I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)
40 Waterview Drive, Shelton, CT
06484
(Address of principal executive offices)
(Zip Code)
(475) 882-4000
(Registrant's telephone number, including area code)
SECURITIES REGISTERED PURSUANT TO SECTION 12(b) OF THE ACT:
Title of each Class
Name of Exchange on which Registered
Class A Common — $.01 par value (20 votes per share)
New York Stock Exchange
Class B Common — $.01 par value (1 vote per share)
New York Stock Exchange
Series A Junior Participating Preferred Stock Purchase Rights
New York Stock Exchange
Series B Junior Participating Preferred Stock Purchase Rights
New York Stock Exchange
 
 
SECURITIES REGISTERED PURSUANT TO SECTION 12(g) OF THE ACT:
NONE
Indicate by check mark
Yes
No
if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.
þ
¨
if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934.
¨
þ
if the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such report), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.
þ
¨
whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).
þ
¨
if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.
þ
whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):
Large accelerated filer þ
Accelerated filer ¨
Non-accelerated filer ¨
(Do not check if a smaller reporting company)
Smaller reporting company ¨
whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).
¨
þ
The approximate aggregate market value of the voting stock held by non-affiliates of the registrant as of June 30, 2014 was $$7,152,795,896*. The number of shares outstanding of the Class A Common Stock and Class B Common Stock as of February 11, 2015 was 7,167,506 and 51,339,048 respectively.
DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE
Portions of the definitive proxy statement for the annual meeting of shareholders scheduled to be held on May 5, 2015, to be filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”), are incorporated by reference in answer to Part III of this Form 10-K.
*Calculated by excluding all shares held by Executive Officers and Directors of registrant and the Louie E. Roche Trust, the Harvey Hubbell Trust, the Harvey Hubbell Foundation and the registrant’s pension plans, without conceding that all such persons or entities are “affiliates” of registrant for purpose of the Federal Securities Laws.



Table of contents
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


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PART I
 
ITEM 1    Business

 
Hubbell Incorporated (herein referred to as “Hubbell”, the “Company”, the “registrant”, “we”, “our” or “us”, which references shall include its divisions and subsidiaries as the context may require) was founded as a proprietorship in 1888, and was incorporated in Connecticut in 1905. Hubbell is primarily engaged in the design, manufacture and sale of quality electrical and electronic products for a broad range of non-residential and residential construction, industrial and utility applications. Products are either sourced complete, manufactured or assembled by subsidiaries in the United States, Canada, Switzerland, Puerto Rico, Mexico, the People’s Republic of China (“China”), Italy, the United Kingdom (“UK”), Brazil and Australia. Hubbell also participates in joint ventures in Taiwan and Hong Kong, and maintains offices in Singapore, China, India, Mexico, South Korea and countries in the Middle East.
 
The Company’s reporting segments consist of the Electrical segment (comprised of electrical systems products and lighting products) and the Power segment, as described below. See also
Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis – “Executive Overview of the Business”, and “Results of Operations” as well
 
as Note 20 – Industry Segments and Geographic Area Information in the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.
 
The Company’s annual report on Form 10-K, quarterly reports on Form 10-Q, current reports on Form 8-K, and all amendments to those reports are made available free of charge through the Investor Relations section of the Company’s website at http://www.hubbell.com as soon as practicable after such material is electronically filed with, or furnished to, the SEC. These filings are also available for reading and copying at the SEC’s Public Reference Room at 100 F Street N.E., Washington, D.C. 20549. Information on the operation of the Public Reference Room may be obtained by calling the SEC at 1-800-SEC-0330. In addition, the Company’s SEC filings can be accessed from the SEC’s homepage on the Internet at http://www.sec.gov. The information contained on the Company’s website or connected to our website is not incorporated by reference into this Annual Report on Form 10-K and should not be considered part of this report.


Electrical Segment
 

The Electrical segment (71%, 71% and 69% of consolidated revenues in 2014, 2013 and 2012, respectively) is comprised of businesses that sell stock and custom products including standard and special application wiring device products, rough-in electrical products, connector and grounding products, lighting fixtures and controls, as well as other electrical equipment. The products are typically used in and around industrial, commercial and institutional facilities by electrical contractors, maintenance personnel, electricians and telecommunications companies. In addition, certain businesses design and manufacture a variety of high voltage test and measurement equipment, industrial controls and communication systems used in the non-residential and industrial markets. Many of these products are designed such that they can also be used in harsh and hazardous locations where a potential for fire and explosion exists due to the presence of flammable gasses and vapors. Harsh and hazardous products are primarily used in the oil and gas (onshore and offshore) and mining industries. There are also a


 
variety of lighting fixtures, wiring devices and electrical products that have residential and utility applications.
 
These products are primarily sold through electrical and industrial distributors, home centers, retail and hardware outlets, lighting showrooms and residential product oriented internet sites. Special application products are sold primarily through wholesale distributors to contractors, industrial customers and original equipment manufacturers (“OEMs”). High voltage products are sold primarily by direct sales to customers through our sales engineers. Hubbell maintains a sales and marketing organization to assist potential users with the application of certain products to their specific requirements, and with architects, engineers, industrial designers, OEMs and electrical contractors for the design of electrical systems to meet the specific requirements of industrial, non-residential and residential users. Hubbell is also represented by independent manufacturers’ sales agents for many of its product offerings.
 


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Hubbell Electrical Systems
 
Hubbell designs, manufactures and sells thousands of wiring and electrical products which are supplied principally to industrial, non-residential and residential customers. These products include items such as:
Cable reels
Wiring devices & accessories
Junction boxes, plugs & receptacles
Cable glands & fittings
Switches & dimmers
Datacom connectivity & enclosures
Connectors & tooling
Pin & sleeve devices
Speciality communications equipment
Floor boxes
Electrical motor controls
High voltage test systems
Ground fault devices
Steel & plastic enclosures
Mining communication & controls
 
These wiring and electrical products are sold under various brands and/or trademarks, including:
Hubbell®
Bell®
Victor
Rig Power
Kellems®
TayMac®
GAI-Tronics®
Powerohm
Bryant®
Wiegmann®
Gleason Reel®
Chalmit™
Burndy®
Killark®
Haefely®
Austdac™
CMC®
Hawke
Hipotronics®
Raco®
 

Lighting Products
 
Hubbell manufactures and sells lighting fixtures and controls for indoor and outdoor applications. The markets served include non-residential and residential. For the non-residential market the Company typically targets products that would be considered specification grade. A fast growing trend within the lighting industry is the adoption of light emitting diode (“LED”) technology as the light source. LED technology is both energy
 
efficient and long–lived and as a result offers customers the economic benefits of lower energy and maintenance costs. The Company has a broad array of LED-luminaire products within its portfolio and the majority of new product development efforts are oriented towards expanding those offerings. Examples of these lighting products or applications include:

Canopy lights
Parking lot/parking garage fixtures
Decorative landscape fixtures
Emergency lighting/exit signs
Bollards
Fluorescent fixtures
Floodlights & poles
Bath/vanity fixtures & fans
Ceiling fans
LED components
Chandeliers & sconces
Site & area lighting
Recessed, surface mounted & track fixtures
Athletic & recreational field fixtures
Occupancy, dimming & daylight harvesting sensors
 
These lighting products are sold under various brands and/or trademarks, including:
Kim Lighting®
Security Lighting Systems™
Spaulding Lighting™
Kurt Versen™
Sportsliter Solutions™
Columbia Lighting®
Alera Lighting®
Prescolite®
Beacon Products™
Precision Paragon™[P2]™
Progress Lighting®
Dual-Lite®
Architectural Area Lighting™
Hubbell Building Automation™
Hubbell Outdoor Lighting™
Litecontrol

Power Segment
 

The Power segment (29%, 29% and 31% of consolidated revenues in 2014, 2013 and 2012, respectively) consists of operations that design and manufacture various distribution, transmission, substation and telecommunications products primarily used by the electrical utility industry. In addition, certain of these products are used in the civil construction and transportation industries. Products are sold to distributors and


 
directly to users such as electric utilities, telecommunication companies, pipeline and mining operations, industrial firms, construction and engineering firms. While Hubbell believes its sales in this area are not materially dependent upon any customer or group of customers, a substantial decrease in purchases by electrical utilities would affect this segment.
 


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Distribution, Transmission and Substation Utility Products
 
Hubbell manufactures and sells a wide variety of electrical distribution, transmission, substation and telecommunications products. These products include items such as:
Arresters
High voltage bushings
Grounding equipment
Cutouts & fuse links
Insulators
Programmable reclosers
Pole line hardware
Cable terminations & accessories
Sectionalizers
Helical anchors & foundations
Formed wire products
Lineman tools, hoses & gloves
Overhead, pad mounted & capacitor switches
Splices, taps & connectors
Polymer concrete & fiberglass enclosures and equipment pads
 

These products are sold under the following brands and/or trademarks:
 
Ohio Brass®
Chance®
Anderson®
PenCell®
Fargo®
Hubbell®
Polycast®
Opti-loop
Quazite®
Quadri*sil®
Trinetics®
Reuel
Electro Composites
USCO
CDR
RFL®
Hot Box®
PCORE®
Delmar
 
 

Information Applicable to All General Categories
 

International Operations
 
The Company has several operations located outside of the United States. These operations manufacture, assemble and/or market Hubbell products and service both the Electrical and Power segments.
 
As a percentage of total net sales, shipments from foreign operations directly to third parties were 14% in 2014, 16% in 2013 and 17% in 2012, with the Canadian and UK operations representing approximately 31% and 26%, respectively, of 2014 total international net sales. Switzerland, Brazil and Mexico each represent 10% of 2014 total international sales. See also Note 20-Industry Segments and Geographic Area Information in the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements and Item 1A. Risk Factors relating to manufacturing in and sourcing from foreign countries.
 
Raw Materials
 
Raw materials used in the manufacture of Hubbell products primarily include steel, aluminum, brass, copper, bronze, plastics, phenolics, zinc, nickel, elastomers and petrochemicals. Hubbell also purchases certain electrical and electronic components, including solenoids, lighting ballasts, printed circuit boards, integrated circuit chips and cord sets, from a number of suppliers. Hubbell is not materially dependent upon any one supplier for raw materials used in the manufacture of its products and equipment, and at the present time, raw materials and components essential to its operation are in adequate supply. However, some of these principal raw materials are sourced from a limited number of suppliers. See also Item 7A. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk.
 
 
Patents
 
Hubbell has approximately 1,600 active United States and foreign patents covering many of its products, which expire at various times. While Hubbell deems these patents to be of value, it does not consider its business to be dependent upon patent protection. Hubbell also licenses products under patents owned by others, as necessary, and grants licenses under certain of its patents.
 
Working Capital
 
Inventory, accounts receivable and accounts payable levels, payment terms and, where applicable, return policies are in accordance with the general practices of the electrical products industry and standard business procedures. See also Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.
 
Backlog
 
Substantially all of the backlog existing at December 31, 2014 is expected to be shipped to customers in 2015. Backlog of orders believed to be firm at December 31, 2014 was approximately $333.7 million compared to $295.4 million at December 31, 2013. Although this backlog is important, the majority of Hubbell’s revenues result from sales of inventoried products or products that have short periods of manufacture.
 
Competition
 
Hubbell experiences substantial competition in all categories of its business, but does not compete with the same companies in all of its product categories. The number and size of competitors vary considerably depending on the product line. Hubbell cannot specify with precision the number of competitors


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in each product category or their relative market position. However, some of its competitors are larger companies with substantial financial and other resources. Hubbell considers product performance, reliability, quality and technological innovation as important factors relevant to all areas of its business, and considers its reputation as a manufacturer of quality products to be an important factor in its business. In addition, product price, service levels and other factors can affect Hubbell’s ability to compete.

Research and Development
 
Research and development expenditures represent costs to discover and/or apply new knowledge in developing a new product or process, or in bringing about significant improvement in an existing product or process. Research and development expenses are recorded as a component of Cost of goods sold. Expenses for research and development were approximately 2% of Cost of goods sold for each of the years 2014, 2013 and 2012.
 
Environment
 
The Company is subject to various federal, state and local government requirements relating to the protection of employee health and safety and the environment. The Company believes that, as a general matter, its policies, practices and procedures are properly designed to prevent unreasonable risk of
 
environmental damage and personal injury to its employees and its customers’ employees and that the handling, manufacture, use and disposal of hazardous or toxic substances are in accordance with environmental laws and regulations.
 
Like other companies engaged in similar businesses, the Company has incurred or acquired through business combinations, remedial response and voluntary cleanup costs for site contamination and is a party to product liability and other lawsuits and claims associated with environmental matters, including past production of product containing toxic substances. Additional lawsuits, claims and costs involving environmental matters are likely to continue to arise in the future. However, considering past experience and reserves, the Company does not anticipate that these matters will have a material impact on earnings, capital expenditures, financial condition or competitive position. See also Item 1A. Risk Factors and Note 15 — Commitments and Contingencies in the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.
 
Employees
 
As of December 31, 2014, Hubbell had approximately 15,400 salaried and hourly employees of which approximately 8,400 of these employees, or 54%, are located in the United States. Approximately 2,400 of these U.S. employees are represented by 17 labor unions. Hubbell considers its labor relations to be satisfactory.


















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Executive Officers of the Registrant
Name
Age(1)
Present Position
Business Experience
David G. Nord
57
Chairman of the Board, President and Chief Executive Officer
Present position since May 2014; President and Chief Executive Officer since January 2013; President and Chief Operating Officer from June 2012 to January 2013, and Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer from September 2005 to June 2012. Previously, various positions, including Vice President, Controller, of United Technologies and its subsidiaries, 2000-2005.
William R. Sperry
52
Senior Vice President and
Chief Financial Officer
Present position since June 6, 2012; Vice President, Corporate Strategy and Development August 15, 2008 to June 6, 2012; previously, Managing Director, Lehman Brothers August 2006 to April 2008, various positions, including Managing Director, of J.P. Morgan and its predecessor institutions, 1994-2006.
Gary N. Amato
63
Executive Vice President
(Electrical Segment)
Present position since June 30, 2014; Group Vice President (Electrical Systems) December 2008- June 30, 2014; Group Vice President (Electrical Products) October 2006-December 2008; Vice President October 1997-September 2006; Vice President and General Manager of the Company’s Industrial Controls Divisions (ICD) 1989-1997; Marketing Manager, ICD, April 1988-March 1989.
Gerben W. Bakker
50
Group Vice President
(Power Systems)
Present position since February 1, 2014; previously, Division Vice President, Hubbell Power Systems, Inc. (“HPS”) August 2009 - February 1, 2014; President, HPS Brazil June 2005 – July 2009; Vice President, Sourcing, HPS March 2004 – May 2005.
James H. Biggart, Jr.
62
Vice President and Treasurer
Present position since January 1, 1996; Treasurer since 1987; Assistant Treasurer 1986-1987; Director of Taxes 1984-1986.
Joseph A. Capozzoli
40
Vice President and
Controller
Present position since April 22, 2013; previously, Assistant Corporate Controller of Stanley Black & Decker, Inc. (“Stanley”) April 2011 to April 2013; Global Operations Controller at Stanley 2010-2011; Director of Cost Accounting at Stanley, 2006-2010.
An-Ping Hsieh
54
Vice President, General
Counsel
Present position since September 4, 2012; previously, Vice President, Secretary and Associate General Counsel of United Technologies Corporation (“UTC”) February 2008 to September 2012; Vice President and General Counsel, UTC Fire and Security 2003-2008; Deputy General Counsel, Otis Elevator Company, a United Technologies company 2001-2003.
Stephen M. Mais
50
Vice President,
Human Resources
Present position since August 22, 2005; previously Director, Staffing and Capability, Pepsi Bottling Group (“Pepsi”) 2001-2005; Director, Human Resources Southeastern U.S., Pepsi 1997-2001.
W. Robert Murphy
65
Executive Vice President,
Marketing and Sales
Present position since October 1, 2007; Senior Group Vice President 2001-2007; Group Vice President 2000-2001; Senior Vice President Marketing and Sales (Wiring Systems) 1985-1999; and various sales positions (Wiring Systems) 1975-1985.
William T. Tolley
57
Senior Vice President,
Growth and Innovation
Present position since February 1, 2014, previously, Group Vice President (Power Systems) December 23, 2008-February 1, 2014; Group Vice President (Wiring Systems) October 1, 2007-December 23, 2008; Senior Vice President of Operations and Administration (Wiring Systems) October 2005-October 2007; Director of Special Projects April 2005-October 2005; administrative leave November 2004-April 2005; Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer February 2002-November 2004.
(1)
As of February 19, 2015.

There are no family relationships between any of the above-named executive officers. For information related to our Board of Directors, refer to Item 10. Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance.
 


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ITEM 1A    Risk Factors
 
Our business, operating results, financial condition, and cash flows may be impacted by a number of factors including, but not limited to those set forth below. Any one of these factors could cause our actual results to vary materially from recent results or future anticipated results. See also Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis — “Executive Overview of the Business”, “Outlook”, and “Results of Operations”.
 
We operate in markets that are subject to competitive pressures that could affect selling prices or demand for our products.
 
We compete on the basis of product performance, quality, service and/or price. Our competitive strategy is to design and manufacture high quality products at the lowest possible cost. Our strategy is to also increase selling prices to offset rising costs of raw materials and components. Competitive pricing pressures may not allow us to offset some or all of our increased costs through pricing actions. Alternatively, if raw material and component costs decline, the Company may not be able to maintain current pricing levels. Competition could also affect future selling prices or demand for our products which could have an adverse impact on our results of operations, financial condition and cash flows.
 
Global economic uncertainty could adversely affect us.
 
During periods of prolonged slow growth, or a downturn in conditions in the worldwide or domestic economies, we could experience reduced orders, payment delays, supply chain disruptions or other factors caused by economic challenges faced by our customers, prospective customers and suppliers. Depending upon their severity and duration, these conditions could have an adverse impact on our results of operations, financial condition and cash flows.
 
We may not be able to successfully implement initiatives, including our restructuring activities, that improve productivity and streamline operations to control or reduce costs.
 
Achieving our long-term profitability goals depends significantly on our ability to control or reduce our operating costs. Because many of our costs are affected by factors outside, or substantially outside, our control, we generally must seek to control or reduce costs through productivity initiatives. If we are not able to identify and implement initiatives that control or reduce costs and increase operating efficiency, or if the cost savings initiatives we have implemented to date do not generate expected cost savings, our financial results could be adversely impacted. Our efforts to control or reduce costs may include restructuring activities involving workforce reductions, facility consolidations and other cost reduction initiatives. If we do not successfully manage our current restructuring activities, or any other restructuring activities that we may undertake in the future, expected efficiencies and benefits may be delayed or not realized, and our operations and business could be disrupted.
 



 
We manufacture and source products and materials from various countries throughout the world. A disruption in the availability, price or quality of these products or materials could impact our operating results.
 
Our business is subject to risks associated with global manufacturing and sourcing. We use a variety of raw materials in the production of our products including steel, aluminum, brass, copper, bronze, zinc, nickel and plastics. We also purchase certain electrical and electronic components, including lighting ballasts, printed circuit boards and integrated circuit chips from third party providers. Significant shortages in
the availability of these materials or significant price increases could increase our operating costs and adversely impact the competitive positions of our products, which could adversely impact our results of operations.
 
We continue to increase the amount of materials, components and finished goods that are sourced from or manufactured in foreign countries including Mexico, China, and other international countries. Political instability in any country where we do business could have an adverse impact on our results of operations.
 
We rely on our suppliers to produce high quality materials, components and finished goods according to our specifications. Although we have quality control procedures in place, there is a risk that products may not meet our specifications which could impact our ability to ship quality products to our customers on a timely basis, which could adversely impact our results of operations.
 
Future tax law changes could increase our prospective tax expense. In addition, tax payments may ultimately differ from amounts currently recorded by the Company.
 
We are subject to income taxes as well as non-income based taxes, in both the United States and various foreign jurisdictions. We are subject to ongoing tax audits in various jurisdictions. Tax authorities may disagree with certain positions we have taken and assess additional taxes. We regularly assess the likely outcomes of these audits in order to determine the appropriateness of our tax provisions. However, there can be no assurance that we will accurately predict the outcomes of these audits, and the future outcomes of these audits could adversely affect our results of operations, financial condition and cash flows.
 
We engage in acquisitions and strategic investments and may encounter difficulty in obtaining appropriate acquisitions and in integrating these businesses.
 
Part of the Company’s future growth strategy involves acquisitions. We have pursued and will continue to seek acquisitions and other strategic investments to complement and expand our existing businesses. The rate and extent to which acquisitions become available may impact our growth rate. The success of these transactions will depend on our ability to integrate these businesses into our operations and realize the planned synergies. We may encounter difficulties in integrating acquisitions into our operations and in managing strategic investments. Failure to effectively complete or manage


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acquisitions may adversely affect our existing businesses as well as our results of operations, financial condition and cash flows.
 
We are subject to risks surrounding our information systems.
 
The proper functioning of Hubbell’s information systems is critical to the successful operation of our business. Although our information systems are protected with robust backup and security systems, these systems are still susceptible to outages due to fire, floods, power loss, telecommunications failures, viruses, break-ins and similar events, or breaches of security. A failure of our information technology systems could impact our ability to process orders, maintain proper levels of inventory, collect accounts receivable and pay expenses; all of which could have an adverse effect on our results of operations, financial condition and cash flows. In addition, security breaches could result in unauthorized disclosure of confidential information that may result in financial or reputational damage to the Company.

We have continued to work on improving our utilization of our enterprise resource planning system, expanding standardization of business processes and performing implementations at our remaining businesses. We expect to incur additional costs related to future implementations, process reengineering efforts as well as enhancements and upgrades to the system. These system modifications and implementations could result in operating inefficiencies which could adversely impact our operating results and/or our ability to perform necessary business transactions.
 
Deterioration in the credit quality of our customers could have a material adverse effect on our operating results and financial condition.
 
We have an extensive customer base of distributors, wholesalers, electric utilities, OEMs, electrical contractors, telecommunications companies and retail and hardware outlets. We are not dependent on a single customer, however, our top ten customers account for approximately one-third of our net sales. Deterioration in the credit quality of several major customers could adversely affect our results of operations, financial condition and cash flows.
 
Inability to access capital markets or failure to maintain our credit ratings may adversely affect our business.
 
Our ability to invest in our business and make strategic acquisitions may require access to the capital markets. If general economic and capital market conditions deteriorate significantly, it could impact our ability to access the capital markets. Failure to maintain our credit ratings could also impact our ability to access credit markets and could adversely impact our cost of borrowing. While we have not encountered significant financing difficulties recently, the capital and credit markets have experienced significant volatility in recent years. Market conditions could make it more difficult for us to access capital to finance our investments and acquisitions. This could adversely affect our results of operations, financial condition and cash flows.
 
 
If the underlying investments of our defined benefit plans do not perform as expected, we may have to make additional contributions to these plans.
 
We sponsor certain pension and other postretirement defined benefit plans. The performance of the financial markets and interest rates impact these plan expenses and funding obligations. Significant changes in market interest rates, investment losses on plan assets and reductions in discount rates may increase our funding obligations and could adversely impact our results of operations and cash flows. Furthermore, there can be no assurance that the value of the defined benefit plan assets will be sufficient to meet future funding requirements.
 
Volatility in currency exchange rates may adversely affect our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.
 
Our international operations accounted for approximately 14% of our net sales in 2014. We are exposed to the effects (both positive and negative) that fluctuating exchange rates have on translating the financial statements of our international operations, most of which are denominated in local currencies, into the U.S. dollar. Fluctuations in exchange rates may affect
product demand and reported profits in our international operations. In addition, currency fluctuations may affect the prices we pay suppliers for materials used in our products. As a result, fluctuating exchange rates may adversely impact our results of operations and cash flows.
 
Our success depends on attracting and retaining qualified personnel.
 
Our ability to sustain and grow our business requires us to hire, retain and develop a highly skilled and diverse management team and workforce. Failure to ensure that we have the depth and breadth of personnel with the necessary skill set and experience could impede our ability to deliver our growth objectives and execute our strategy.
 
Our reputation and our ability to conduct business may be impaired by improper conduct by any of our employees, agents or business partners.
 
We cannot provide absolute assurance that our internal controls and compliance systems will always protect us from acts committed by our employees, agents or business partners that would violate U.S. and/or non-U.S. laws, including the laws governing payments to government officials, bribery, fraud, anti-kickback and false claims rules, competition, export and import compliance, money laundering and data privacy. In particular, the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, the U.K. Bribery Act, and similar anti-bribery laws in other jurisdictions generally prohibit companies and their intermediaries from making improper payments to government officials for the purpose of obtaining or retaining business, and we operate in parts of the world that have experienced governmental corruption to some degree. Despite meaningful measures that we undertake to facilitate lawful conduct, which include training and internal control policies, these measures may not always prevent reckless or criminal acts by our employees or agents. Any such improper actions could damage our reputation and subject us to civil or criminal investigation in the United States and in other jurisdictions, could lead to substantial civil and criminal,


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monetary and non-monetary penalties and could cause us to incur significant legal and investigative fees.
 
Our inability to effectively develop and introduce new products could adversely affect our ability to compete.
 
New product introductions and enhancement of existing products and services are key to the Company’s competitive strategy. The success of new product introductions is dependent on a number of factors, including, but not limited to, timely and successful development of new products, market acceptance of these products and the Company’s ability to manage the risks associated with these introductions. These risks include production capabilities, management of inventory levels to support anticipated demand, the risk that new products may have quality defects in the early stages of introduction, and obsolescence risk of existing products. The Company cannot predict with certainty the ultimate impact new product introductions could have on our results of operations, financial condition or cash flows.
 
We could incur significant and/or unexpected costs in our efforts to successfully avoid, manage, defend and litigate intellectual property matters.
 
The Company relies on certain patents, trademarks, copyrights, trade secrets and other intellectual property of which the Company cannot be certain that others have not and will not infringe upon. Although management believes that the loss or expiration of any single intellectual property right would not have a material impact on its operating results, intellectual property litigation could be costly and time consuming and the Company could incur significant legal expenses pursuing these claims against others.
 
From time to time, we receive notices from third parties alleging intellectual property infringement. Any dispute or litigation involving intellectual property could be costly and time-consuming due to the complexity and the uncertainty of intellectual property litigation. Our intellectual property portfolio may not be useful in asserting a counterclaim, or negotiating a license, in response to a claim of infringement or misappropriation. In addition, as a result of such claims, the Company may lose its rights to utilize critical technology or may be required to pay substantial damages or license fees with respect to the infringed rights or be required to redesign our products at a substantial cost, any of which could negatively impact our operating results. Even if we successfully defend against claims of infringement, we may incur significant costs that could adversely affect our results of operations, financial condition and cash flow. See Item 3 “Legal Proceedings” for a discussion of our legal proceedings.
 
We may be required to recognize impairment charges for our goodwill and other intangible assets.
 
As of December 31, 2014, the net carrying value of our goodwill and other intangible assets totaled approximately $1.2 billion. As required by generally accepted accounting principles, we periodically assess these assets to determine if they are impaired. Impairment of intangibles assets may be triggered by developments both within and outside the Company’s control. Deteriorating economic conditions, technological changes, disruptions to our business, inability to effectively integrate acquired businesses, unexpected significant changes or
 
planned changes in use of the assets, intensified competition, divestitures, market capitalization declines and other factors may impair our goodwill and other intangible assets. Any charges relating to such impairments could adversely affect our results of operations in the periods an impairment is recognized.
 
We have two classes of common stock with different voting rights, which results in a concentration of voting power of our common stock.
 
As of December 31, 2014, the holders of our Class A Common Stock (with 20 votes per share) held approximately 74% of the voting power represented by all outstanding shares of our common stock and approximately 13% of the Company’s total equity value, and the Hubbell Trust and Roche Trust collectively held approximately 49% of our Class A Common Stock. The holders of the Class A Common Stock thus are in a position to influence matters that are brought to a vote of the holders of our common stock, including, among others, the election of the board of directors, any amendments to our charter documents, and the approval of material transactions. In order to further the interests of our shareholders, the Company routinely reviews various alternatives to meet its capital structure objectives, including equity, reclassification and debt transactions.
 
We are subject to litigation and environmental regulations that may adversely impact our operating results.
 
We are a party to a number of legal proceedings and claims, including those involving product liability, intellectual property and environmental matters, which could be significant. It is not possible to predict with certainty the outcome of every claim and lawsuit. In the future, we could incur judgments or enter into settlements of lawsuits and claims that could have a materially adverse effect on our results of operations and financial condition. In addition, while we maintain insurance coverage with respect to certain claims, such insurance may not provide adequate coverage against such claims. We establish reserves based on our assessment of contingencies, including contingencies related to legal claims asserted against us. Subsequent developments in legal proceedings may affect our assessment and estimates of the loss contingency recorded as a reserve and require us to make additional payments, which could have a materially adverse effect on our results of operations, financial condition and cash flow.
 
We are also subject to various laws and regulations relating to environmental protection and the discharge of materials into the environment, and we could incur substantial costs as a result of the noncompliance with or liability for clean up or other costs or damages under environmental laws. In addition, we could be affected by future laws or regulations, including those imposed in response to climate change concerns. Compliance with any future laws and regulations could result in a materially adverse affect on our business and financial results. See Item 3 “Legal Proceedings” for a discussion of our legal proceedings.
 





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New regulations related to conflict-free minerals may cause us to incur additional expenses and may create challenges with our customers.
 
The Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act contains provisions to improve transparency and accountability regarding the use of “conflict” minerals mined from the Democratic Republic of Congo and adjoining countries (“DRC”). In August 2012 the SEC established annual disclosure and reporting requirements for those companies who use “conflict” minerals sourced from the DRC in their products. These new requirements could limit the pool of suppliers who can provide conflict-free minerals and as a result, we cannot ensure that we will be able to obtain these conflict-free minerals at competitive prices. Compliance with these new requirements may also increase our costs. In addition, we may face challenges with our customers if we are unable to sufficiently verify the origins of the minerals used in our products.
 
Health care reform could adversely affect our operating results.
 
In 2010, the United States federal government enacted comprehensive health care reform legislation. Due to the breadth and complexity of this legislation, as well as its phased-in nature of implementation and lack of interpretive guidance, it
 
is difficult for the Company to predict the overall effects it will have on our business. To date, the Company has not experienced material costs related to the health care reform legislation, however, it is possible that our operating results could be adversely affected in the future by increased costs, expanded liability exposure and requirements that change the ways we provide healthcare and other benefits to our employees.
 
We face the potential harms of natural disasters, terrorism, acts of war, international conflicts or other disruptions to our operations.
 
Natural disasters, acts or threats of war or terrorism, international conflicts, and the actions taken by the United States and other governments in response to such events could cause damage to or disrupt our business operations, our suppliers or our customers, and could create political or economic instability, any of which could have an adverse effect on our business. Although it is not possible to predict such events or their consequences, these events could decrease demand for our products, make it difficult or impossible for us to deliver products, or disrupt our supply chain.



ITEM 1B    Unresolved Staff Comments
 
None
 

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ITEM 2    Properties

Hubbell’s manufacturing and warehousing facilities, classified by reporting segment, are located in the following countries. The Company believes its manufacturing and warehousing facilities are adequate to carry on its business activities.
 
 
 
Number of Facilities
Total Approximate Floor
Area in Square Feet
Segment
Location
Warehouses

Manufacturing

Owned

 
Leased

Electrical segment
United States
12

33

3,511,100

 
1,677,600

 
Australia
1

2


 
39,600

 
Brazil

1

105,900

 

 
Canada
2

3

178,700

 
24,700

 
Italy

1


 
8,100

 
Mexico
1

3

665,700

 
43,300

 
China

2


 
287,900

 
Puerto Rico

1

162,400

 

 
Singapore
1



 
8,700

 
Switzerland

1

95,000

 

 
United Kingdom
1

4

133,600

 
53,600

Power segment
United States
1

13

2,438,500

 
157,000

 
Brazil

1

138,300

 

 
Canada

1

30,000

 

 
Mexico
1

1

167,300

(1) 
181,100

 
China
1

1


 
74,600

TOTAL
 
21

68

7,626,500

 
2,556,200

(1) The Power segment shares an owned manufacturing building in Mexico with the Electrical segment. The building is included in the Electrical segment facility count.


ITEM 3    Legal Proceedings
 
The Company is subject to various legal proceedings arising in the normal course of its business. These proceedings include claims for damages arising out of use of the Company’s products, intellectual property, workers’ compensation and environmental matters. The Company is self-insured up to specified limits for certain types of claims, including product liability and workers’ compensation, and is fully self-insured for certain other types of claims, including environmental and intellectual property matters. The Company recognizes a liability for any contingency that in management’s judgment is probable of occurrence and can be reasonably estimated. We continually reassess the likelihood of adverse judgments and outcomes in these matters, as well as estimated ranges of possible losses based upon an analysis of each matter which includes consideration of outside legal counsel and, if applicable, other experts.

 
In the fourth quarter of 2014, the Company settled litigation involving Powerweb Energy, Inc. (“Powerweb”).  The lawsuit had alleged claims arising from the Company’s development and sale of wiHUBB wireless lighting technology.  The Company believes that it had meritorious defenses against the claims and had vigorously defended itself in the matter. During 2013, the Company recorded an accrual equal to the low end of its estimated range of outcome. During the third quarter of 2014 the parties engaged in settlement discussions and the Company increased the accrual by $4.0 million based on those discussions. In view of several considerations including the inherent uncertainty of litigation, and the expense of a trial, the Company settled the litigation. The settlement payment made by the Company did not exceed the amounts previously reserved for the litigation.




ITEM 4    Mine Safety Disclosures
 
Not applicable.
 


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PART II

ITEM 5    Market for the Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

The Company’s Class A and Class B Common Stock is principally traded on the New York Stock Exchange under the symbols “HUBA” and “HUBB”. The following tables provide information on market prices, dividends declared, number of common shareholders, and repurchases by the Company of shares of its Class A and Class B Common Stock.
 
Market Prices (Dollars Per Share)
 
Class A Common
 
Class B Common
Years Ended December 31,
 
High

Low

 
High

Low

2014 — Fourth quarter
 

131.60

105.27

 
127.29

101.44

2014 — Third quarter
 

129.50

120.22

 
126.96

115.34

2014 — Second quarter
 

125.68

104.20

 
125.40

112.71

2014 — First quarter
 

114.00

94.24

 
122.55

106.47

2013 — Fourth quarter
 

97.98

91.02

 
109.29

101.51

2013 — Third quarter
 

99.91

89.40

 
110.90

99.63

2013 — Second quarter
 

93.51

83.08

 
102.68

91.94

2013 — First quarter
 

88.00

78.62

 
97.73

84.80

Dividends Declared (Dollars Per Share)
 

Class A Common
 
Class B Common
Years Ended December 31,
 

2014

2013

 
2014

2013

First quarter
 

0.50

0.45

 
0.50

0.45

Second quarter
 

0.50

0.45

 
0.50

0.45

Third quarter
 

0.50

0.45

 
0.50

0.45

Fourth quarter
 

0.56

0.50

 
0.56

0.50

Number of Common Shareholders of Record
 

 

 

 
 

 

At December 31,
2014

2013

2012

 
2011

2010

Class A
369

394

426

 
458

483

Class B
2,093

2,225

2,389

 
2,549

2,731

 
Our dividends are declared at the discretion of our Board of Directors. In October 2014, the Company’s Board of Directors approved an increase in the common stock dividend rate from $0.50 to $0.56 per share per quarter. The increased quarterly dividend payment commenced with the December 15, 2014 payment made to the shareholders of record on November 28, 2014.
 
Purchases of Equity Securities

In September 2011, the Board of Directors approved a stock repurchase program and authorized the repurchase of up to $200 million of Class A and Class B Common Stock. During
2014, the Company spent $35.0 million on the repurchase of
 
common shares under the September 2011 program prior to its expiration in September 2014. In October 2014, the Board of Directors approved a new stock repurchase program ("October 2014 program") and authorized the repurchase of up to $300 million of Class A and Class B Common Stock. The October 2014 program expires in October 2017. As of December 31, 2014, approximately $229.5 million remains authorized for future repurchases under the October 2014 program. Depending upon numerous factors, including market conditions and alternative uses of cash, we may conduct discretionary repurchases through open market and privately negotiated transactions during our normal trading windows. The Company did not repurchase any Class A Common Stock during 2014.



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The following table summarizes the Company's repurchase activity of Class B Common Stock during the quarter ended December 31, 2014:

 
 
Total Number of Class B Shares Purchased (000's)
 
Average Price Paid per Class B Share
 
Approximate Value of Shares that May Yet Be Purchased Under the Programs (in millions)
BALANCE AS OF SEPTEMBER 30, 2014
 
 
 
 
 
$

October 2014
 
200

 
$
109.35

 
$
278.1

November 2014
 
431

 
$
111.67

 
$
230.0

December 2014
 
5

 
$
102.09

 
$
229.5

TOTAL FOR THE QUARTER ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2014
 
636

 
$
110.87

 
$
229.5


Corporate Performance Graph
 
 
The following graph compares the total return to shareholders on the Company’s Class B Common Stock during the five years ended December 31, 2014, with a cumulative total return on the (i) Standard & Poor’s MidCap 400 (“S&P MidCap 400”) and (ii) the Dow Jones U.S. Electrical Components & Equipment Index (“DJUSEC”). The Company is a member of the S&P MidCap 400. As of December 31, 2014, the DJUSEC reflects a group of
 
fourteen company stocks in the electrical components and equipment market segment, and serves as the Company’s peer group for purposes of this graph. The comparison assumes $100 was invested on December 31, 2009 in the Company’s Class B Common Stock and in each of the foregoing indices and assumes reinvestment of dividends.

 
COMPARISON OF 5 YEAR CUMULATIVE TOTAL RETURN*
Among Hubbell Incorporated, the S&P Midcap 400 Index,
and the Dow Jones US Electrical Components & Equipment Index
 
 

*$100 invested on 12/31/09 in stock or index, including reinvestment of dividends. Fiscal year ending December 31.
Copyright© 2015 S&P, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies Inc. All rights reserved. 
Copyright© 2015 Dow Jones & Co. All rights reserved.

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ITEM 6    Selected Financial Data
 
The following summary should be read in conjunction with the consolidated financial statements and notes contained herein (dollars and shares in millions, except per share amounts).
 
OPERATIONS, years ended December 31,
2014

2013

2012

2011

2010

 
Net sales
$
3,359.4

$
3,183.9

$
3,044.4

$
2,871.6

$
2,541.2

 
Gross profit
$
1,109.0

$
1,070.5

$
1,012.2

$
923.7

$
828.7

 
Operating income
$
517.4

$
507.6

$
471.8

$
423.8

$
367.8

 
Operating income as a % of sales
15.4
%
15.9
%
15.5
%
14.8
%
14.5
%
 
Loss on extinguishment of debt
$

$

$

$

$
(14.7
)
(1) 
Net income attributable to Hubbell
$
325.3

$
326.5

$
299.7

$
267.9

$
217.2

(1) 
Net income attributable to Hubbell as a % of net sales
9.7
%
10.3
%
9.8
%
9.3
%
8.5
%
 
Net income attributable to Hubbell as a % of Hubbell shareholders’ average equity
17.0
%
18.3
%
19.2
%
18.3
%
15.8
%
 
Earnings per share — diluted
$
5.48

$
5.47

$
5.00

$
4.42

$
3.59

(1) 
Cash dividends declared per common share
$
2.06

$
1.85

$
1.68

$
1.52

$
1.44

 
Average number of common shares outstanding — diluted
59.2

59.6

59.8

60.4

60.3

 
Cost of acquisitions, net of cash acquired
$
183.8

$
96.5

$
90.7

$
29.6

$

 
FINANCIAL POSITION, AT YEAR-END
 

 

 

 

 

 
Working capital
$
1,130.3

$
1,165.4

$
1,008.9

$
861.4

$
781.1

 
Total assets
$
3,322.8

$
3,187.2

$
2,947.0

$
2,846.5

$
2,705.8

 
Total debt
$
599.0

$
597.5

$
596.7

$
599.2

$
597.7

 
Total Hubbell shareholders’ equity
$
1,927.1

$
1,906.4

$
1,661.2

$
1,467.8

$
1,459.2

 
NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES, AT YEAR-END
15,400

14,300

13,600

13,500

13,000

 
(1)
In 2010, the Company recorded a $14.7 million pre-tax charge ($9.1 million after-tax) related to its early extinguishment of debt. The earnings per diluted share impact of this charge was $0.15.


ITEM 7    Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

Executive Overview of the Business
 
 
The Company is primarily engaged in the design, manufacture and sale of quality electrical and electronic products for a broad range of non-residential and residential construction, industrial and utility applications. Products are either sourced complete, manufactured or assembled by subsidiaries in the United States, Canada, Switzerland, Puerto Rico, China, Mexico, Italy, the United Kingdom, Brazil and Australia. The Company also participates in joint ventures in Taiwan and Hong Kong, and maintains offices in Singapore, China, India, Mexico, South Korea and countries in the Middle East. The Company employs approximately 15,400 individuals worldwide.
 
The Company made the following management changes in 2014 as part of its succession planning program.

 
In February 2014, the Company promoted Mr. Gerben W. Bakker to Group Vice President, Power Systems. Mr. William T. Tolley, the previous Group Vice President, Power Systems, has been named to the newly created position of Senior Vice President, Growth and Innovation.

On May 6, 2014, the Board of Directors appointed Mr. David G. Nord to the position of Chairman of the Board, in addition to his role as President and Chief Executive Officer. Mr. Nord succeeded Mr. Timothy H. Powers, the former Chairman of the Board, who retired from the Board in May 2014.

On June 30, 2014, Mr. Gary N. Amato was appointed to the position of Executive Vice President, Hubbell Electrical Segment. In this role, he acquired oversight of the Hubbell


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Lighting business, in addition to his leadership role over the Electrical Systems businesses. Mr. Amato assumed responsibility for the Lighting business following the announcement of the retirement of Mr. Scott H. Muse.

The Company’s reporting segments consist of the Electrical segment and the Power segment. Results for 2014, 2013 and 2012 by segment are included under “Segment Results” within this Management’s Discussion and Analysis.
 
The Company is focused on growing profits and delivering attractive returns to our shareholders by executing a business plan focused on the following key initiatives: revenue growth, price realization, productivity improvements and capital deployment.
 
As part of our revenue growth initiative, we remain focused on expanding market share through new product introductions and more effective utilization of sales and marketing efforts across the organization. In addition, we continue to assess opportunities to expand sales through acquisitions of
 
businesses that fill product line gaps or allow for expansion into new markets.

Price realization and productivity improvements are key areas of focus for our company. Productivity programs impact virtually all functional areas within the Company by rationalizing our manufacturing footprint and activities through restructuring actions, reducing or eliminating waste and improving processes. We continue to expand our efforts surrounding global product and component sourcing and supplier cost reduction programs. Value engineering efforts, product transfers and the use of lean process improvement techniques are expected to continue to increase manufacturing efficiency. In addition, we continue to build upon the benefits of our enterprise resource planning system across all functions and have also implemented a sustainability program across the organization. Material costs are approximately two-thirds of our cost of goods sold therefore volatility in this area can significantly impact profitability. Our goal is to have pricing and productivity programs that offset material and other inflationary cost increases as well as pay for investments in key growth areas.


Outlook
 
 
For 2015, we expect our overall net sales to increase by five to seven percent compared to 2014, with acquisitions contributing between five and six percent. Our outlook for net sales growth from acquisitions in 2015 includes the acquisitions we completed in January 2015, which are expected to add approximately $100 million to annual net sales.

Third party forecasts for our end markets point to improving organic demand in each of our businesses, with the exception of significantly weaker energy related markets. We expect our end markets could grow approximately one to two percent in 2015 led by high single digit growth in the residential market. The non-residential market is expected to grow in the mid-single digit range, industrial market growth is expected to be in the low to mid-single digit range, while transmission and distribution products in the utility market are anticipated to grow by one to two percent. We anticipate our net sales could benefit from growth in these end markets, but could also be dampened by a fifteen to twenty percent decline in the net sales of our Harsh and Hazardous products in 2015, which reflects an expectation of continued weakness in energy related markets.

We plan to continue to work on productivity initiatives and to make other strategic investments aimed at improving our cost structure and operating efficiency, including improved sourcing, product redesign and lean projects focused on both factory and back office efficiencies. In 2015 we plan to continue and expand on restructuring activities that were initiated in 2014. In 2015 we expect our earnings per diluted share will include approximately $0.25 cents of restructuring and related costs and anticipate those activities and investments will generate savings in 2016 in excess of those costs. We also anticipate continued cost increases from certain materials, healthcare and other inflationary costs, including higher pension costs.
 
 
From a profitability standpoint, we expect organic sales growth and acquisitions will contribute to earnings per share growth in 2015; however that growth will be partially offset by weak end markets for our Harsh and Hazardous products relating to the recent decline in oil prices. Additionally, we expect that foreign exchange will also be a headwind in 2015. We expect that our full year diluted earnings per share in 2015 will be in the range of $5.35 to $5.55, including approximately $0.25 of restructuring and related costs.

In 2015, we expect free cash flow (defined as cash flows from operations less capital expenditures) to be approximately 90% of net income and will include the impact of increased spending in 2015 on restructuring and related activities as well as higher capital spending on new product development.

Finally, with our strong financial position, we expect to continue to enhance shareholder value through capital deployment including both share repurchases and acquisitions. We anticipate that our 2015 acquisitions will contribute incremental earnings, but will be approximately 30 basis points dilutive to operating margin in 2015 as those acquisitions are burdened in the early periods with the impact of purchase accounting amortization.





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Results of Operations
 
 
Our operations are classified into two reportable segments: Electrical and Power. For a complete description of the Company’s segments, see Part I, Item 1 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K. Within these segments, Hubbell primarily serves customers in the non-residential and residential construction, industrial and utility markets. The Company’s served markets, in order of magnitude of net sales for the Company, are primarily non-residential construction, industrial, utility and to a lesser extent, residential construction.
 
In 2014, our overall end markets improved slightly. Our largest end market, non-residential construction, grew on the continued
 
strength of the renovation and relights markets as well as increased demand for private construction spending. The residential market also grew in 2014, albeit at a more modest pace than the past several years. The industrial market was mixed in 2014 as increased spending for maintenance, repairs and operations (MRO) was offset by flat demand for our harsh and hazardous businesses and weaker demand for high voltage test equipment. The utility market grew modestly in 2014 on slightly higher spending for distribution and transmission products.



SUMMARY OF CONSOLIDATED RESULTS (IN MILLIONS, EXCEPT PER SHARE DATA)
 
 
For the Year Ending December 31,
 
2014

% of Net sales
2013

% of Net sales
2012

% of Net sales
Net sales
$
3,359.4

 

$
3,183.9

 
$
3,044.4

 
Cost of goods sold
2,250.4

67.0
%
2,113.4

66.4
%
2,032.2

66.8
%
Gross profit
1,109.0

33.0
%
1,070.5

33.6
%
1,012.2

33.2
%
Selling & administrative expenses
591.6

17.6
%
562.9

17.7
%
540.4

17.7
%
Operating income
517.4

15.4
%
507.6

15.9
%
471.8

15.5
%
Net income attributable to Hubbell
325.3

9.7
%
326.5

10.3
%
299.7

9.8
%
EARNINGS PER SHARE - DILUTED
$
5.48

 

$
5.47

 

$
5.00

 

 
2014 Compared to 2013
 
Net Sales
 
Net sales for the year ended 2014 were $3.4 billion, an increase of six percent over the year ended 2013. Acquisitions added four percentage points to net sales in 2014 compared to 2013 while volume increased net sales by two percentage points. Price realization was flat and foreign currency translation was slightly negative and not significant to the year over year change in net sales.
 
Cost of Goods Sold
 
As a percentage of net sales, cost of goods sold increased to 67.0% for 2014 compared to 66.4% in 2013. The increase was primarily due to unfavorable business and product mix, higher material costs, and cost inflation in excess of productivity, including approximately 10 basis points from higher warranty and related costs in the Electrical segment incurred in the third quarter of 2014.
 
Gross Profit
 
The gross profit margin for 2014 declined to 33.0% compared to 33.6% in 2013. The decrease was primarily due to unfavorable business and product mix, higher material costs, and cost inflation in excess of productivity, including approximately 10 basis points from higher warranty and related
 
costs in the Electrical segment incurred in the third quarter of 2014.
 
Selling & Administrative Expenses (“S&A”)
 
S&A expense increased five percent compared to 2013 primarily due to the addition of S&A expense of acquired businesses. As a percentage of net sales, S&A expense declined to 17.6% in 2014 compared to 17.7% in 2013 primarily due to the favorable impact of volume leverage.
 
Operating Income

Operating income increased two percent in 2014 to $517.4 million, while operating margin declined by 50 basis points to 15.4%. The increase in operating income is primarily due to the favorable impact of higher organic volume and the contribution of acquisitions, which exceeded the unfavorable impact of business and product mix, and cost increases that are described within the discussion of Gross Profit. The increase in organic volume and contribution of acquisitions, in aggregate, were not significant to operating margin.
 
Total Other Expense
 
In 2014, total other expense, which is primarily interest expense on long-term debt, was $31.9 million compared to $33.8 million in 2013. The $1.9 million decrease was primarily due to lower


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net foreign currency transaction losses in 2014 compared to 2013.
 
Income Taxes
 
The effective tax rate in 2014 was 32.6% compared to 30.4% in 2013. The increase in the tax rate for 2014 was due primarily to the benefit in 2013 of the retroactive application of certain 2012 tax provisions, including the research and development tax credit, that were part of the American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012, which became law during the first quarter of 2013, a comparative increase in domestic earnings and decrease in foreign earnings in low tax jurisdictions, as well as certain discrete tax items. Additional information related to the Company’s effective tax rate is included in Note 12 — Income Taxes in the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.
 
Net Income Attributable to Hubbell and Earnings Per Diluted Share
 
For the reasons described above, net income attributable to Hubbell decreased 0.4% in 2014. Earnings per diluted share in 2014 increased 0.2% compared to 2013 as the average number of diluted shares outstanding for the year were lower by approximately 0.4 million as compared to 2013.
 
Segment Results
 
Electrical Segment
 
(In millions)
2014

2013

Net sales
$
2,398.2

$
2,262.6

Operating income
$
337.9

$
341.1

Operating margin
14.1
%
15.1
%
 
Net sales in the Electrical segment increased six percent in 2014 compared with 2013 due to acquisitions and higher organic volume. Acquisitions added almost four percentage points and organic volume almost three percentage points to net sales. Price realization was positive but not significant and was offset by the impact of negative foreign currency translation.
 
Within the segment, electrical systems products net sales increased five percent in 2014 compared to 2013 due to acquisitions and higher organic volume. Price realization was positive but not significant and was offset by the impact of negative foreign currency translation. Higher organic net sales of electrical systems products was driven by strength in our wiring, connectors and grounding products that support the non-residential and residential construction markets, partially offset by weak demand for our high voltage test equipment and Harsh and Hazardous products that support the extractive industries. Net sales of lighting products increased eight percent in 2014 compared to 2013 due to acquisitions and strong organic volume in the non-residential market, which continued to benefit from increased relight and retrofit renovation project demand, and growth in the residential market.
 
Operating income in 2014 was $337.9 million, a one percent decrease compared to 2013, while operating margin declined by 100 basis points to 14.1%. The decline in operating margin reflects cost inflation in excess of productivity, including approximately 20 basis points from restructuring actions
 
initiated in the fourth quarter of 2014, and unfavorable business and product mix, partially offset by higher organic volume and price realization. Operating margin for the year ended 2014 also includes higher warranty and related costs which were incurred in the third quarter of 2014, and contributed approximately 15 basis points to the decline. The decrease in operating income can be attributed to these factors and also includes the contribution of acquisitions, which were 10 basis points dilutive to operating margin.
 
Power Segment
 
(In millions)
2014

2013

Net sales
$
961.2

$
921.3

Operating income
$
179.5

$
166.5

Operating margin
18.7
%
18.1
%
 
Net sales in the Power segment increased four percent in 2014 compared to 2013 due to acquisitions and organic volume. Acquisitions contributed four percentage points to net sales and organic volume contributed two percentage points. Higher organic volume was driven by modest growth in distribution and transmission spending. Price realization was negative and foreign currency translation was unfavorable, each by one percentage point.
 
Operating income increased eight percent to $179.5 million and operating margin increased by 60 basis points to 18.7% in 2014 compared to 2013. The increase in operating margin reflects productivity in excess of cost inflation and lower facility closure costs in 2014, partially offset by higher material costs and negative price realization. The increase in operating income can be attributed to these factors and also includes the contribution of acquisitions, which were 20 basis points dilutive to operating margin.
 
2013 Compared to 2012
 
Net Sales
 
Net sales for the year ended 2013 were $3.2 billion, an increase of five percent over the year ended 2012. Acquisitions added three percentage points to net sales in 2013 compared to 2012 while volume increased net sales by two percentage points. Price realization was offset by unfavorable foreign currency translation, each less than one percentage point.
 
Cost of Goods Sold
 
As a percentage of net sales, cost of goods sold decreased to 66.4% for 2013 compared to 66.8% in 2012. The decrease was primarily due to productivity in excess of other cost increases, favorable price realization and slightly lower material costs. Lower material costs for commodities such as copper, steel and aluminum more than offset higher costs for resins, chemicals, purchased finished goods and value added components.
 


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Gross Profit
 
The gross profit margin for 2013 expanded to 33.6% compared to 33.2% in 2012. The increase was primarily due to productivity in excess of other cost increases, favorable price realization and slightly lower material costs. Lower material costs for commodities such as copper, steel and aluminum more than offset higher costs for resins, chemicals, purchased finished goods and value added components, as described above.
 
Selling & Administrative Expenses (“S&A”)
 
S&A expense increased four percent compared to 2012 primarily due to the impact of the businesses acquired. Higher costs for wages, benefits, legal and advertising were almost entirely offset by lower pension costs and other spending reductions. As a percentage of net sales, S&A expenses remained constant at 17.7% in 2013 compared to 2012.
 
Operating Income
 
Operating income increased eight percent to $507.6 million primarily due to higher net sales and gross profit partially offset by higher selling and administrative costs, as described above. Operating margin of 15.9% in 2013 increased 40 basis points compared to 15.5% in 2012 as a result of productivity, lower material costs and price realization, partially offset by other inflationary increases.
 
Total Other Expense
 
In 2013, total other expense was $33.8 million compared to $30.0 million in 2012. The $3.8 million increase was primarily due to higher net foreign currency transaction losses in 2013 compared to 2012.
 
Income Taxes
 
The effective tax rate in 2013 was 30.4% compared to 31.6% in 2012. The lower tax rate for 2013 was due primarily to both the current year and retroactive application of certain tax provisions, including the research and development tax credit that were part of the American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012, which became law during the first quarter of 2013. Additional information related to the Company’s effective tax rate is included in Note 12 — Income Taxes in the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.

Net Income attributable to Hubbell and Earnings Per Diluted Share
 
For the reasons described above, net income attributable to Hubbell and earnings per diluted share in 2013 each increased nine percent compared to 2012. The average number of diluted shares outstanding for the year were lower by approximately 0.2 million as compared to 2012.
 
 
Segment Results
 
Electrical Segment
 
(In millions)
2013

2012

Net sales
$
2,262.6

$
2,114.6

Operating income
$
341.1

$
303.7

Operating margin
15.1
%
14.4
%
 
Net sales in the Electrical segment increased seven percent in 2013 compared with 2012 due to acquisitions and higher organic volume. Acquisitions and organic volume added four and three percentage points, respectively, to net sales. In addition, price realization was offset by the negative impacts of foreign currency translation, each less than one percentage point.
 
Within the segment, electrical systems products net sales increased seven percent in 2013 compared to 2012 due to acquisitions and slightly higher organic demand. Favorable price realization was offset by unfavorable foreign currency translation. Higher net sales of electrical systems products included growth in high voltage projects and improvements in the construction sector. The extractive industries sector was essentially flat while industrial demand was lower. Net sales of lighting products increased eight percent in 2013 compared to 2012 due to strong organic volume growth in the non-residential market, which continued to benefit from increased relight and retrofit renovation project demand, strong growth in the residential market and the impact of the Norlux acquisition.
 
Operating income in 2013 increased twelve percent to $341.1 million compared to 2012 while operating margin expanded by 70 basis points to 15.1%. Operating income increased primarily due to acquisitions, higher volume and favorable price realization partially offset by unfavorable product mix driven by lower industrial demand. In addition, productivity exceeded all other cost increases. Operating margin improved primarily due to productivity in excess of cost increases, lower material costs and favorable price realization.
 
Power Segment
 
(In millions)
2013

2012

Net sales
$
921.3

$
929.8

Operating income
$
166.5

$
168.1

Operating margin
18.1
%
18.1
%

Net sales in the Power segment declined one percent in 2013 compared to 2012. The decrease was due to lower organic volume and the unfavorable impact of foreign currency translation largely offset by the impact of an acquisition. The acquisition contributed two percentage points to net sales, while


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the decline in organic volume and impact of foreign currency translation decreased net sales by two and one percentage points, respectively. The organic volume decline was almost entirely due to the impact of higher sales in the fourth quarter of 2012 related to Superstorm Sandy.
 
 
Operating income decreased one percent to $166.5 million and operating margin remained at 18.1% in 2013 compared to 2012. The drop in operating income was primarily due to lower volume, unfavorable price realization, higher material costs and other cost increases, including $5.0 million of facility consolidation costs, partially offset by productivity improvements and favorable product mix.

 


Financial Condition, Liquidity and Capital Resources
 
 
Cash Flow
 
December 31,
(In millions)
2014

2013

2012

Net cash provided by (used in):
 
 
 
Operating activities
$
391.5

$
381.8

$
349.1

Investing activities
(242.6
)
(151.1
)
(116.1
)
Financing activities
(215.6
)
(130.9
)
(161.7
)
Effect of foreign currency exchange rate changes on cash and cash equivalents
(20.1
)
(4.1
)
4.1

NET CHANGE IN CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS
$
(86.8
)
$
95.7

$
75.4

 
2014 Compared to 2013
 
Cash provided by operating activities for 2014 increased compared to 2013 primarily due to higher net income after adjusting for the non-cash impacts of depreciation and amortization, stock-based compensation and deferred income taxes, and a lower use of cash for working capital, partially offset by higher pension contributions. Cash used for changes in working capital was $44.7 million in 2014 compared to $55.1 million of cash used in 2013 primarily due to increased collection of accounts receivable.
 
Cash used for investing activities of $242.6 million in 2014 compared to cash used of $151.1 million in 2013. This increase is primarily due to an $87.3 million increase in net cash used for acquisitions in 2014 as compared to 2013.
 
Cash used for financing activities of $215.6 million in 2014 compared to $130.9 million of cash used in 2013. This increase is primarily the result of $74.5 million of higher spending on the repurchase of common shares and an $11.9 million increase in dividends paid.

The unfavorable impact of foreign currency exchange rates on cash increased to $20.1 million in 2014 as compared to $4.1 million in 2013 primarily related to the U.S. dollar strengthening against several currencies, most notably the British pound, Australian dollar, Mexican peso and Canadian dollar.
 
2013 Compared to 2012
 
Cash provided by operating activities for the year ended 2013 increased compared to 2012 primarily due to higher net income and lower pension contributions, partially offset by a greater use of cash for working capital. Cash used for changes in working capital was $55.1 million in 2013 compared to $45.3 million of
 
cash used in 2012 primarily due to higher accounts receivable as a result of increased net sales.
 
Investing activities used cash of $151.1 million in 2013 compared to cash used of $116.1 million in 2012. The increase was primarily due to higher capital expenditures, net acquisition investments and lower proceeds from sales of available for sale investments in 2013 as compared to 2012.
 
Financing activities used cash of $130.9 million in 2013 compared to cash used of $161.7 million in 2012. The decrease in cash used is due to a lower spending on the repurchase of common shares, lower proceeds from the exercise of stock options and fewer dividend payments in 2013 as compared to 2012. In 2013, the Company made four dividend payments as compared to five dividend payments made in 2012.

Investments in the Business
 
Investments in our business include both expenditures required to maintain the operation of our equipment and facilities as well as cash outlays in support of our strategic initiatives. During 2014, we used cash of $60.3 million for capital expenditures, an increase of $1.5 million from 2013.
 
In 2014, the Company completed seven acquisitions for $183.8 million, net of cash acquired. Four of these acquisitions were added to the Power segment, while three were added to the Electrical segment. In January 2015, the Company completed three acquisitions for an aggregate cash purchase price of approximately $126 million. Two of these acquisitions were added to the Electrical segment, while one was added to the Power segment. The Company continues to assess


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opportunities to expand sales through acquisitions of businesses that fill product gaps or allow for expansion in new markets. For more information refer to Note 2 – Business Acquisitions in the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.
 
In September 2011, the Board of Directors approved a stock repurchase program and authorized the repurchase of up to $200 million of Class A and Class B Common Stock. During 2014, the Company spent $35.0 million on the repurchase of common shares under the September 2011 program prior to its expiration in September 2014. In October 2014, the Board of Directors approved a new stock repurchase program (the "October 2014 program") and authorized the repurchase of up to $300 million of Class A and Class B Common Stock. The October 2014 program expires in October 2017. As of December 31, 2014, approximately $229.5 million remains authorized for future repurchases under the October 2014 program. Depending upon numerous factors, including market conditions and alternative uses of cash, we may conduct discretionary repurchases through open market and privately negotiated transactions during our normal trading windows.
 
Additional information with respect to future investments in the business can be found under “Outlook” within Management’s Discussion and Analysis.
 
Debt to Capital

At December 31, 2014 and 2013, the Company had $597.6 million and $597.2 million, respectively, of senior long-term
 
notes outstanding, net of unamortized discount. The long-term fixed-rate notes, with amounts of $300 million due in 2018 and 2022, respectively, are callable with a make whole provision and are only subject to accelerated payment prior to maturity if we fail to meet certain non-financial covenants, all of which were met at December 31, 2014.
 
At December 31, 2014 and 2013, the Company had $1.4 million and $0.3 million, respectively, of short-term debt outstanding. During 2013, the Company entered into a credit agreement for a 5.0 million Brazilian reais line of credit to support its Brazilian operations. This line of credit expires in October 2016; however, any undrawn balance is subject to an annual review by the lender. This line is not subject to annual commitment fees. At December 31, 2014, 3.0 million Brazilian reais (equivalent to $1.1 million) was outstanding. There were no borrowings outstanding at December 31, 2013 under this line of credit. Short-term debt is also comprised of outstanding borrowings of 1.7 million Chinese renminbi (equivalent to $0.3 million) under existing lines of credit used to support its operations in China. At December 31, 2013 there were 2.1 million Chinese renminbi (equivalent to $0.3 million) of borrowings outstanding under this line of credit.
 
Net debt, defined as total debt less cash and investments, is a non-GAAP measure that may not be comparable to definitions used by other companies. We consider net debt to be a useful measure of our financial leverage for evaluating the Company’s ability to meet its funding needs.


The following table sets forth the reconciliation of net debt at December 31, 2014 and 2013:
 
December 31,
(In millions)
2014
2013
Total Debt
$
599.0

$
597.5

Total Hubbell Shareholders’ Equity
1,927.1

1,906.4

TOTAL CAPITAL
$
2,526.1

$
2,503.9

Debt to Total Capital
24
 %
24
 %
Cash and Investments
$
705.8

$
786.6

NET DEBT
$
(106.8
)
$
(189.1
)
Net Debt to Total Capital
(4
)%
(8
)%
 
In November 2010, the Company completed a public debt offering for $300 million of long-term, senior, unsecured notes maturing in November 2022 (“2022 Notes”) and bearing interest at a fixed rate of 3.625%. Prior to the issuance of the 2022 Notes, the Company entered into a forward interest rate lock which resulted in a $1.6 million loss. This amount was recorded in Accumulated other comprehensive loss, net of tax, and is being amortized over the life of the 2022 Notes.
 
In May 2008, the Company completed a public offering of $300 million long-term senior, unsecured notes maturing in May 2018 (the “2018 Notes”). The 2018 Notes bear interest at a fixed rate of 5.95%. Prior to the issuance of the 2018 Notes, the Company entered into a forward interest rate lock which resulted in a $1.2 million gain. This amount was recorded in Accumulated other comprehensive loss, net of tax, and is being amortized over the life of the notes.
 
 
The 2018 Notes and the 2022 Notes are both fixed rate indebtedness, are callable at any time with a make whole premium and are only subject to accelerated payment prior to maturity in the event of a default under the indenture governing the terms of the 2018 Notes and 2022 Notes, as modified by the supplemental indentures creating each such series, or upon a change in control event as defined in such indenture.
 
Liquidity
 
We measure liquidity on the basis of our ability to meet short-term and long-term operational funding needs, fund additional investments, including acquisitions, and make dividend payments to shareholders. Significant factors affecting the management of liquidity are cash flows from operating activities, capital expenditures, cash dividend payments, stock repurchases, access to bank lines of credit and our ability to attract long-term capital with satisfactory terms.
 


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The Company had $653.9 million of cash and cash equivalents at December 31, 2014, of which approximately 53% was held outside of the United States. Except for a portion of current earnings, the Company’s intent is to indefinitely reinvest all of its undistributed international earnings and cash internationally. In January 2015 the Company completed three acquisitions for an aggregate cash purchase price of $126 million. Further discussion of the January 2015 acquisitions can be found in Note 22 — Subsequent Events of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.
 
As of December 31, 2014, the Company’s $500 million revolving credit facility had not been drawn against. The credit facility, which serves as a backup to our commercial paper program, is scheduled to expire in March 2018. The interest rate applicable to borrowing under the credit agreement is generally either the prime rate or a surcharge over LIBOR. The single financial covenant in the $500 million credit facility, which the Company is in compliance with, requires that total debt not exceed 55% of total capitalization. Annual commitment fees to support availability under the credit facility are not material.
 
Although not the principal source of liquidity, we believe our credit facility is capable of providing significant financing flexibility at reasonable rates of interest. However, in the event of a significant deterioration in the results of our operations or cash flows, leading to deterioration in financial condition, our borrowing costs could increase and/or our ability to borrow could be restricted. We have not entered into any guarantees that could give rise to material unexpected cash requirements.
 
The Company also maintains other lines of credit that are primarily used to support the issuance of letters of credit. Interest rates and other terms of borrowing under these lines of credit vary from country to country, depending on local market conditions. At December 31, 2014 and 2013 these lines totaled $54.6 million and $60.4 million, respectively, of which $27.1 million and $22.9 million was utilized to support letters of credit and the remaining amount was unused. The annual commitment fees associated with these lines of credit are not material.
 
Internal cash generation together with currently available cash and investments, available borrowing facilities and credit lines, if needed, are expected to be sufficient to fund operations, the current rate of cash dividends, capital expenditures, and an increase in working capital that would be required to accommodate a higher level of business activity for the foreseeable future. We actively seek to expand by acquisition as well as through the growth of our current businesses. While a significant acquisition may require additional debt and/or equity financing, we believe that we would be able to obtain
 
additional financing based on our favorable historical earnings performance and strong financial position.

Pension Funding Status
 
We have a number of funded and unfunded non-contributory U.S. and foreign defined benefit pension plans. Benefits under these plans are generally provided based on either years of service and final average pay or a specified dollar amount per year of service. The funded status of our qualified, defined benefit pension plans is dependent upon many factors including future returns on invested pension assets, the level of market interest rates, employee earnings and employee demographics.
 
Changes in the value of the defined benefit plan assets and liabilities will affect the amount of pension expense ultimately recognized. Although differences between actuarial assumptions and actual results are no longer deferred for balance sheet purposes, deferral is still permitted for pension expense purposes. Unrecognized gains and losses in excess of an annual calculated minimum amount (the greater of 10% of the projected benefit obligation or 10% of the market value of assets) are amortized and recognized in net periodic pension cost over the average remaining service period of our active employees, which approximates 10-12 years. During 2014 and 2013, we recorded $3.9 million and $13.8 million, respectively, of pension expense related to the amortization of these unrecognized losses. We expect to record $12.1 million of expense related to unrecognized losses and prior service cost in 2015.
 
The actual return on our pension assets in 2014 and for the past ten year period has exceeded our expected return. However, over that same period there has been a significant decline in long-term interest rates and a resulting increase in our pension liabilities which has more than offset our favorable return on plan assets. In 2014 and 2012, we contributed $23.5 million and $22.6 million, respectively, to our qualified foreign and domestic defined benefit pension plans. We contributed $3.2 million to our qualified foreign defined benefit pension plans in 2013. These contributions have improved the funded status of all of our plans. Although not required under the Pension Protection Act of 2006, the Company made a voluntary contribution to its qualified domestic defined benefit pension plan of $20.0 million in January 2015. We do not anticipate further contributions to the qualified domestic defined benefit pension plan in 2015. The Company expects to contribute approximately $3.0 million to its foreign plans in 2015. The anticipated 2015 level of pension funding is not expected to have a significant impact on our overall liquidity.




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Assumptions
 
The following assumptions were used to determine projected pension and other benefit obligations at the measurement date and the net periodic benefit costs for the year:
 
 
Pension Benefits
 
Other Benefits
 
2014

2013

 
2014

2013

Weighted-average assumptions used to determine benefit obligations at December 31,
 
 
 
 
 
Discount rate
4.23
%
5.04
%
 
4.10
%
4.60
%
Rate of compensation increase
3.15
%
3.18
%
 
3.00
%
3.00
%
Weighted-average assumptions used to determine net periodic benefit cost for years ended December 31,
 

 

 
 

 

Discount rate
5.04
%
4.22
%
 
4.60
%
4.20
%
Expected return on plan assets
6.06
%
6.70
%
 
N/A

N/A

Rate of compensation increase
3.18
%
3.11
%
 
4.50
%
3.00
%
 
At the end of each year, we estimate the expected long-term rate of return on pension plan assets based on the strategic asset allocation for our plans. In making this determination, we utilize expected rates of return for each asset class based upon current market conditions and expected risk premiums for each asset class. A one percentage point change in the expected long-term rate of return on pension fund assets would have an impact of approximately $8.4 million on 2015 pretax pension expense. The expected long-term rate of return is applied to the fair market value of pension fund assets to produce the expected return on fund assets that is included in pension expense. The difference between this expected return and the actual return on plan assets was recognized at December 31, 2014 for balance sheet purposes, but continues to be deferred for expense purposes. The net deferral of past asset gains (losses) ultimately affects future pension expense through the amortization of gains (losses) with an offsetting adjustment to Hubbell shareholders’ equity through Accumulated other comprehensive loss.
 
At the end of each year, we determine the discount rate to be used to calculate the present value of our pension plan liabilities. For our U.S. and Canadian pension plans, this discount rate is determined by matching the expected cash flows associated with our benefit obligations to a yield curve based on high quality, fixed income debt instruments with maturities that closely match the expected funding period of our pension liabilities. This yield curve is derived using a bond matching approach which incorporates a selection of bonds that align with our projected benefit obligations. As of December 31, 2014, we used a discount rate of 4.3% for our U.S. pension plans compared to a discount rate of 5.1% used in 2013. For our Canadian pension plan, we used a discount rate of 3.95% in 2014, compared to the 4.75% discount rate used in 2013.
 
For our UK pension plan the discount rate was derived using a yield curve fitted to the yields on AA bonds in the Barclays Capital Sterling Aggregate Corporate Index and uses sample plan cash flow data as a proxy to plan specific liability cash flows. The derived discount rate is the single discount rate equivalent to discounting these liability cash flows at the term-dependent spot rates of AA corporate bonds. This methodology resulted in a December 31, 2014 discount rate for the UK pension plan of 3.7% as compared to a discount rate of 4.6% used in 2013
 
An increase of one percentage point in the discount rate would lower our 2015 pretax pension expense by approximately $8.6 million. A discount rate decline of one percentage point would increase our 2015 pretax pension expense by approximately $11.6 million.

In 2014 we changed the mortality table used to calculate the present value of our pension plan liabilities from RP-2000 to the RP-2000 with generational projection using Scale BB-2D. This mortality table was chosen after considering alternative tables including the RP-2014 projected with Scale MP-2014. We chose the RP-2000 with Scale BB-2D because it resulted in the closest match to the plans’ actual experience over the period 2009-2013. This change resulted in an approximately $40 million increase in the projected benefit obligation of our U.S. defined benefit pension plans upon remeasurement at December 31, 2014.
 
Other Post Employment Benefits (“OPEB”)
 
The Company also has a number of health care and life insurance benefit plans covering eligible employees who reached retirement age while working for the Company. These benefits have been discontinued for substantially all future retirees. These plans are not funded and, therefore, no assumed rate of return on assets is required. We use a similar methodology to derive the yield curve for our post employment benefit plan obligations that we use for our pension plans. As of December 31, 2014, the Company used a discount rate of 4.10% to determine the projected benefit obligation compared to a discount rate of 4.6% used in 2013. In accordance with the accounting guidance for retirement benefits, we recorded to Accumulated other comprehensive loss, within Hubbell shareholders’ equity, a charge net of tax of approximately $1.7 million in 2014 and a credit, net of tax, of approximately $0.2 million in 2013, related to the OPEB plans.
 
Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements 

Off-balance sheet arrangements are defined as any transaction, agreement or other contractual arrangement to which an entity that is not included in our consolidated results is a party, under which we, whether or not a party to the arrangement, have, or


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in the future may have: (1) an obligation under a direct or indirect guarantee or similar arrangement, (2) a retained or contingent interest in assets or (3) an obligation or liability, including a contingent obligation or liability, to the extent that it is not fully reflected in the financial statements.
 
 
We do not have any off-balance sheet arrangements as defined above which have or are likely to have a material effect on our financial condition, results of operations or cash flows.
 


Contractual Obligations
 
A summary of our contractual obligations and commitments at December 31, 2014 is as follows (in millions):
 
Payments due by period
 
 Total
2015
 2016-2017
 2018-2019
2019 and
thereafter
Debt obligations(a)
$
601.4

$
1.4

$

$
300.0

$
300.0

Expected interest payments
146.6

28.7

57.4

29.2

31.3

Operating lease obligations
52.7

13.3

17.2

8.8

13.4

Retirement and other benefits(b)
206.1

7.2

14.7

14.9

169.3

Purchase obligations
201.0

196.1

4.9



Obligations under customer incentive programs
40.5

40.5




Income tax payments
5.3

5.3




TOTAL
$
1,253.6

$
292.5

$
94.2

$
352.9

$
514.0

(a)
Amounts exclude unamortized discount
(b)
Amounts above reflect projected funding related to the Company’s non-qualified defined benefit plans. Projected funding obligations of the Company’s qualified defined benefit pension plans are excluded from the table as there are significant factors, such as the future market value of plan assets and projected investment return rates, which could cause actual funding requirements to differ materially from projected funding.

Our purchase obligations include amounts committed under legally enforceable contracts or purchase orders for goods and services with defined terms as to price, quantity, delivery and termination liability. These obligations primarily consist of inventory purchases made in the normal course of business to meet operational requirements and commitments for equipment purchases. As of December 31, 2014, we have $21.6 million of uncertain tax positions reflected in our Consolidated Balance Sheet. We are unable to make a reasonable estimate regarding the timing of settlement of these uncertain tax positions and, as a result, they have been excluded from the table. See Note 12 — Income Taxes in the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.
 
Critical Accounting Estimates
 
Note 1 — Significant Accounting Policies of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements describes the significant accounting policies used in the preparation of our financial statements.
 
Use of Estimates
 
We are required to make assumptions and estimates and apply judgments in the preparation of our financial statements that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities, revenues and expenses and related disclosures. We base our assumptions, estimates and judgments on historical experience, current trends and other factors deemed relevant by management. We continually review these estimates and their underlying assumptions to ensure they are appropriate for the circumstances. Changes in estimates and assumptions used by us could have a material impact on our financial results. We believe that the following estimates are among the most critical in fully understanding and evaluating our reported
 
financial results. These items utilize assumptions and estimates about the effect of future events that are inherently uncertain and are based on our judgment.
 
Revenue Recognition
 
We recognize revenue when persuasive evidence of an arrangement exists, delivery has occurred, the price is determinable and collection is probable. Product is considered delivered to the customer once it has been shipped and title and risk of loss have been transferred. The majority of our revenue is recognized at the time of shipment. Certain of our businesses account for sales discounts and allowances based on sales volumes, specific programs and customer deductions as is customary in the electrical products industry. These items primarily relate to sales volume incentives, special pricing allowances, and returned goods. This requires us to estimate at the time of sale the amounts that should not be recorded as revenue as these amounts are not expected to be collected from customers. We principally rely on historical experience, specific customer agreements, and anticipated future trends to estimate these amounts at the time of shipment.
 
Inventory Valuation
 
We routinely evaluate the carrying value of our inventories to ensure they are carried at the lower of cost or market value. Such evaluation is based on our judgment and use of estimates, including sales forecasts, gross margins for particular product groupings, planned dispositions of product lines, technological events and overall industry trends. In addition, the evaluation is based on changes in inventory management practices which may influence the timing of exiting products and method of disposing of excess inventory.
 


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Excess inventory is generally identified by comparing future expected inventory usage to actual on-hand quantities. Inventory values are reduced for on-hand inventory in excess of pre-defined usage forecasts. Forecast usage is primarily determined by projecting historical (actual) sales and inventory usage levels forward to future periods. Changes in these estimates may necessitate future adjustments to inventory values.
 
Customer Credit and Collections
 
We maintain allowances for doubtful accounts receivable in order to reflect the potential uncollectability of receivables related to purchases of products on open credit. If the financial condition of our customers were to deteriorate, resulting in their inability to make required payments, we may be required to record additional allowances for doubtful accounts.
 
Accrued Insurance
 
We retain a significant portion of the risks associated with workers’ compensation, medical, automobile and general liability insurance. We estimate self-insurance liabilities using a number of factors, including historical claims experience, demographic factors, severity factors and other actuarial assumptions. The accrued liabilities associated with these programs are based upon our estimates of ultimate costs to settle known claims incurred but not reported as of the balance sheet date. These assumptions are periodically reviewed with a third-party actuary to determine the adequacy of these self-insurance reserves. Changes in these assumptions may necessitate future adjustments to these self-insurance liabilities.
 
Employee Benefits Costs and Funding
 
We sponsor domestic and foreign defined benefit pension, defined contribution and other postretirement plans. Major assumptions used in the accounting for these employee benefit plans include the discount rate, expected return on the pension fund assets, rate of increase in employee compensation levels and health care cost increase projections. These assumptions are determined based on Company data and appropriate market indicators, and are evaluated each year as of the plans’ measurement date. Further discussion of the assumptions used in 2014 and 2013 are included above under “Pension Funding Status” and in Note 10 — Retirement Benefits of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.
 
Taxes
 
We account for income taxes in accordance with the applicable accounting guidance which requires that deferred tax assets and liabilities be recognized using enacted tax rates for the effect of temporary differences between the book and tax basis of recorded assets and liabilities. Additionally, deferred tax assets are required to be reduced by a valuation allowance if it is more-likely-than-not that some portion or all of the deferred tax asset will not be realized. The factors used to assess the likelihood of realization of deferred tax assets are the forecast of future taxable income, available tax planning strategies that could be implemented to realize the net deferred tax assets, and future reversals of deferred tax liabilities. Failure to achieve forecasted taxable income can affect the ultimate realization of net deferred tax assets.
 
 
We operate within multiple taxing jurisdictions and are subject to audit in these jurisdictions. The Internal Revenue Service (“IRS”) and other tax authorities routinely review our tax returns. These audits can involve complex issues, which may require an extended period of time to resolve. The Company records uncertain tax positions only when it has determined that it is more-likely-than-not that a tax position will be sustained upon examination by taxing authorities based on the technical merits of the position. The Company uses the criteria established in the accounting guidance to determine whether an item meets the definition of more-likely-than-not. The Company’s policy is to recognize these uncertain tax positions when the more-likely-than-not threshold is met, when the statute of limitations has expired or upon settlement. In management’s opinion, adequate provision has been made for potential adjustments arising from any examinations. See also Note 12 — Income Taxes in the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.
 
Contingent Liabilities
 
We are subject to proceedings, lawsuits, and other claims or uncertainties related to environmental, legal, product and other matters. We routinely assess the likelihood of an adverse judgment or outcome to these matters, as well as the range of potential losses. We record a liability when it is both probable that a liability has been incurred and the amount can be reasonably estimated. A determination of the reserves required, if any, is made after careful analysis, including consultations with outside advisors, where applicable. Where no amount within a range of estimates is more likely, the minimum is accrued. The required reserves may change in the future due to new developments.
 
Valuation of Long-Lived Assets
 
Our long-lived assets include land, buildings, equipment, molds and dies, software, goodwill and other intangible assets. Long-lived assets, other than land, goodwill and indefinite-lived intangibles, are depreciated over their estimated useful lives. The assets and liabilities of acquired businesses are recorded under the acquisition method of accounting at their estimated fair values at the dates of acquisition. Goodwill represents purchase price in excess of fair values assigned to the underlying identifiable net assets of acquired businesses. Intangible assets primarily consist of patents, tradenames and customer related intangibles.

We review depreciable long-lived assets for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount may not be fully recoverable. If such a change in circumstances occurs, the related estimated future undiscounted cash flows expected to result from the use of the asset group and its eventual disposition is compared to the carrying amount. If the sum of the expected cash flows of the asset group is less than the carrying amount, an impairment charge is recorded. The impairment charge is measured as the amount by which the carrying amount exceeds the fair value of the asset. The fair value of impaired assets is determined using expected cash flow estimates, quoted market prices when available and appraisals as appropriate. We did not record any material impairment charges related to long-lived assets in 2014, 2013, or 2012.
 
Goodwill and indefinite-lived intangible assets are reviewed annually for impairment unless circumstances dictate the need


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for more frequent assessment. We perform our goodwill impairment testing as of April 1st of each year unless circumstances dictate the need for more frequent assessments. The accounting guidance provides entities an option of performing a qualitative assessment before performing a quantitative analysis. If the entity determines, on the basis of certain qualitative factors, that it is more-likely-than-not that the goodwill is not impaired, the entity would not need to proceed to the two step goodwill impairment testing process as prescribed in the guidance. The Company has elected to bypass the qualitative assessment and proceeded directly to the quantitative analysis. The goodwill impairment testing requires judgment, including the identification of reporting units, assigning assets and liabilities to reporting units, and determining the fair value of each reporting unit. Significant judgments required to estimate the fair value of reporting units include estimating future discounted cash flows, determining appropriate discount rates and other assumptions. We use internal discounted cash flow estimates to determine fair value. These cash flow estimates are derived from historical experience and future long-term business plans and the application of an appropriate discount rate. Changes in these estimates and assumptions could materially affect the determination of fair value and/or goodwill impairment for each reporting unit. As of April 1, 2014, our goodwill testing resulted in fair values for each reporting unit that substantially exceeded the reporting unit’s carrying value. We have not recorded any goodwill impairments since the initial adoption of the accounting guidance in 2002.
 
The identification and measurement of impairment of indefinite-lived intangible assets involves an assessment of qualitative factors to determine whether events or circumstances indicate that it is more likely than not that an indefinite-lived intangible asset is impaired. If it is more likely than not that the asset is imparied, the fair value of the indefinite lived intangibles will be determined using discounted cash flow estimates. If the carrying value of these assets exceeds the estimated fair value, the carrying value will be reduced to the estimated fair value. We did not record any impairments related to indefinite-lived intangible assets in 2014, 2013, or 2012.
 
Stock-Based Compensation
 
We determine the grant date fair value of our stock-based compensation awards using either a lattice model or the Black-Scholes option pricing model. Both of these models require management to make certain assumptions with respect to selected model inputs. These inputs include assumptions for the expected term, stock volatility, dividend yield and risk-free interest rate. Changes in these inputs impact fair value and could impact our stock-based compensation expense in the future. In addition, we are required to estimate the expected forfeiture rate and recognize expense only for those awards expected to meet the service and performance vesting conditions. If our actual forfeiture rate is different from our estimate, adjustments to stock-based compensation expense may be required. See also Note 17 – Stock-Based Compensation in the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.
 
 
Forward-Looking Statements
 
Some of the information included in this Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations, and elsewhere in this Form 10-K, contain “forward-looking statements” as defined by the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. These include statements about liquidity, pension funding, capital resources, performance and results of operations and are based on our reasonable current expectations. In addition, all statements regarding anticipated growth or improvement in operating results, anticipated market conditions, restructuring activities and improvements to cost structure and operating efficiencies are forward looking. Forward-looking statements may be identified by the use of words, such as “believe”, “expect”, “anticipate”, “intend”, “depend”, “should”, “plan”, “estimated”, “predict”, “could”, “may”, “subject to”, “continues”, “growing”, “prospective”, “forecast”, “projected”, “purport”, “might”, “if”, “contemplate”, “potential”, “pending,” “target”, “goals”, “scheduled”, “will likely be”, and similar words and phrases. Discussions of strategies, plans or intentions often contain forward-looking statements. Important factors, among others, that could cause our actual results and future actions to differ materially from those described in forward-looking statements include, but are not limited to:
 
Changes in demand for our products, market conditions, product quality, or product availability adversely affecting sales levels.
Changes in markets or competition adversely affecting realization of price increases.
Failure to achieve projected levels of efficiencies, cost savings and cost reduction measures, including those expected as a result of our restructuring activities, lean initiative and strategic sourcing plans.
The expected benefits and the timing of other actions in connection with our enterprise resource planning system.
Availability and costs of raw materials, purchased components, energy and freight.
Changes in expected or future levels of operating cash flow, indebtedness and capital spending.
General economic and business conditions in particular industries, markets or geographic regions, as well as inflationary trends.
Regulatory issues, changes in tax laws or changes in geographic profit mix affecting tax rates and availability of tax incentives.
A major disruption in one or more of our manufacturing or distribution facilities or headquarters, including the impact of plant consolidations and relocations.
Changes in our relationships with, or the financial condition or performance of, key distributors and other customers, agents or business partners which could adversely affect our results of operations.
Impact of productivity improvements on lead times, quality and delivery of product.
Anticipated future contributions and assumptions including changes in interest rates and plan assets with respect to pensions.


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Adjustments to product warranty accruals in response to claims incurred, historical experiences and known costs.
Unexpected costs or charges, certain of which might be outside of our control.
Changes in strategy, economic conditions or other conditions outside of our control affecting anticipated future global product sourcing levels.
Ability to carry out future acquisitions and strategic investments in our core businesses as well as the acquisition related costs.
Unanticipated difficulties integrating acquisitions as well as the realization of expected synergies and benefits anticipated when we first enter into a transaction.
The ability of governments to meet their financial obligations.
Political unrest in foreign countries.
Natural disasters.
Failure of information technology systems or security breaches resulting in unauthorized disclosure of confidential information.
Future repurchases of common stock under our common stock repurchase program.
 
Changes in accounting principles, interpretations, or estimates.
The outcome of environmental, legal and tax contingencies or costs compared to amounts provided for such contingencies.
Adverse changes in foreign currency exchange rates and the potential use of hedging instruments to hedge the exposure to fluctuating rates of foreign currency exchange on inventory purchases.
Other factors described in our SEC filings, including the “Business”, “Risk Factors” and “Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk” sections in this Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2014.

Any such forward-looking statements are not guarantees of future performances and actual results, developments and business decisions may differ from those contemplated by such forward-looking statements. The Company disclaims any duty to update any forward-looking statement, all of which are expressly qualified by the foregoing, other than as required by law.



ITEM 7A    Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk

In the operation of our business, we have various exposures to areas of risk related to factors within and outside the control of management. Significant areas of risk and our strategies to manage the exposure are discussed below.
 
We manufacture and/or assemble our products in the United States, Canada, Switzerland, Puerto Rico, Mexico, China, Italy, UK, Brazil and Australia and sell products in those markets as well as through offices in Singapore, China, India, Mexico, South Korea and countries in the Middle East. Hubbell also participates in joint ventures in Taiwan and Hong Kong. Shipments from non-U.S. subsidiaries as a percentage of the Company’s total net sales were 14% in 2014, 16% in 2013 and 17% in 2012, with the Canadian and UK operations representing approximately 31% and 26%, respectively, of 2014 total international net sales. Switzerland, Brazil and Mexico each represent 10% of 2014 total international sales. As such, our operating results could be affected by changes in foreign currency exchange rates or weak economic conditions in the foreign markets in which we sell our products. To manage this exposure, we closely monitor the working capital requirements of our international units and may enter into forward foreign exchange contracts. Further discussion of forward exchange contracts can be found in Note 14 – Fair Value Measurement in the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.
 
Product purchases representing approximately 15% of our net sales are sourced from unaffiliated suppliers located outside the United States, primarily in China and other Asian countries, Europe and Brazil. We are continuously seeking to expand this
 
activity, particularly related to purchases from low cost areas of the world. Foreign sourcing of products may result in unexpected fluctuations in product cost or increased risk of business interruption due to lack of product or component availability due to any one of the following:
 
Political or economic uncertainty in the source country
Fluctuations in the rate of exchange between the U.S. dollar and the currencies of the source countries
Increased logistical complexity including supply chain interruption or delay, port of departure or entry disruption and overall time to market
Loss of proprietary information
Product quality issues outside the control of the Company
We have developed plans that address many of these risks. Such actions include careful selection of products to be outsourced and the suppliers selected; ensuring multiple sources of supply; limiting concentrations of activity by port, broker, freight forwarder, etc.; processes related to quality control; and maintaining control over operations, technologies and manufacturing deemed to provide competitive advantage. Many of our businesses have a dependency on certain basic raw materials needed to produce their products including steel, aluminum, brass, copper, bronze, plastics, phenols, zinc, nickel, elastomers and petrochemicals as well as purchased electrical and electronic components. Our financial results could be


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affected by the availability and changes in prices of these materials and components.
 
Certain of these materials are sourced from a limited number of suppliers. These materials are also key source materials for many other companies in our industry and within the universe of industrial manufacturers in general. As such, in periods of rising demand for these materials, we may experience both increased costs and/or limited supply. These conditions can potentially result in our inability to acquire these key materials on a timely basis to produce our products and satisfy our incoming sales orders. Similarly, the cost of these materials can rise suddenly and result in materially higher costs of producing our products. We believe we have adequate primary and secondary sources of supply for each of our key materials and that, in periods of rising prices, we expect to recover a majority of the increased cost in the form of higher selling prices. However, recoveries typically lag the effect of cost increases due to the nature of our markets.
 
Our financial results are subject to interest rate fluctuations to the extent there is a difference between the amount of our interest-earning assets and the amount of interest-bearing liabilities. The principal objectives of our investment management activities are to preserve capital while earning net investment income that is commensurate with acceptable levels
 
of interest rate, default and liquidity risk taking into account our funding needs. As part of our investment management strategy, we may use derivative financial products such as interest rate hedges and interest rate swaps.
 
From time to time or when required, we issue commercial paper, which exposes us to changes in interest rates. Our cash position includes amounts denominated in foreign currencies. We manage our worldwide cash requirements by considering available funds held by our subsidiaries and the cost effectiveness with which these funds can be accessed.
 
We continually evaluate risk retention and insurance levels for product liability, property damage and other potential exposures to risk. We devote significant effort to maintaining and improving safety and internal control programs, which are intended to reduce our exposure to certain risks. We determine the level of insurance coverage and the likelihood of a loss and believe that the current levels of risk retention are consistent with those of comparable companies in the industries in which we operate. There can be no assurance that we will not incur losses beyond the limits of our insurance. However, our liquidity, financial position and profitability are not expected to be materially affected by the levels of risk retention that we accept. 


The following table presents cost information related to fixed rate interest risk sensitive instruments by maturity at December 31, 2014 (dollars in millions):
 
 
2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

 Thereafter

 Total

Fair Value
12/31/14

ASSETS
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Available-for-sale investments
$
7.7

$
7.0

$
3.8

$
8.9

$
7.2

$
7.9

$
42.5

$
43.0

Avg. interest rate
4.56
%
5.00
%
5.00
%
5.09
%
5.00
%
4.86
%
 

 

LIABILITIES
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Long-term debt
$

$

$

$
299.2

$

$
298.4

$
597.6

$
645.1

Avg. interest rate



5.95
%
%
3.625
%
 

 

 
We use derivative financial instruments only if they are matched with a specific asset, liability, or proposed future transaction. We do not speculate or use leverage when trading a financial derivative product. See also Note 6 – Investments and Note 11 – Debt in the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.

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ITEM 8    Financial Statements and Supplementary Data


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Financial Statement Schedule
 
 
 
 
All other schedules are omitted because they are not applicable or the required information is shown in the consolidated financial statements or notes thereto.
 


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Reports of Management
 
Report on Management’s Responsibility for Financial Statements
 
 
Our management is responsible for the preparation, integrity and fair presentation of its published financial statements. The financial statements have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America and include amounts based on informed judgments made by management.
 
We believe it is critical to provide investors and other users of our financial statements with information that is relevant, objective, understandable and timely, so that they can make informed decisions. As a result, we have established and maintain systems and practices and internal control processes designed to provide reasonable, but not absolute, assurance that transactions are properly executed and recorded and that our policies and procedures are carried out appropriately. Management strives to recruit, train and retain high quality people to ensure that controls are designed, implemented and maintained in a high-quality, reliable manner.
 




 
Our independent registered public accounting firm audited our financial statements and the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting in accordance with standards established by the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Their report appears on the next page within this Annual Report on Form 10-K.
 
Our Board of Directors normally meets nine times per year to provide oversight, to review corporate strategies and operations, and to assess management’s conduct of the business. The Audit Committee of our Board of Directors is comprised of at least three individuals all of whom must be “independent” under current New York Stock Exchange listing standards and regulations adopted by the SEC under the federal securities laws. The Audit Committee meets regularly with our internal auditors and independent registered public accounting firm, as well as management to review, among other matters, accounting, auditing, internal controls and financial reporting issues and practices. Both the internal auditors and independent registered public accounting firm have full, unlimited access to the Audit Committee.


Management’s Annual Report on Internal Control over Financial Reporting
 
 
Management is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate systems of internal control over financial reporting as defined by Rules 13a-15(f) and 15d-15(f) under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. Our internal control over financial reporting is designed to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external reporting purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles. Because of its inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements. Management has assessed the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2014. In


 
making this assessment, management used the criteria set forth in Internal Control-Integrated Framework (2013 framework) issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission ("COSO"). Based on this assessment, management concluded that our internal control over financial reporting was effective at a reasonable assurance level as of December 31, 2014.
 
The effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2014 has been audited by PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP, our independent registered public accounting firm as stated in their report which is included on the next page within this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

 
/s/ DAVID G. NORD
 
/s/ WILLIAM R. SPERRY
David G. Nord
 
William R. Sperry
Chairman of the Board, President and Chief Executive Officer
 
Senior Vice President
and Chief Financial Officer
 


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Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm
 
 
To the Board of Directors and Shareholders of Hubbell Incorporated:
 
In our opinion, the consolidated financial statements listed in the accompanying index present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of Hubbell Incorporated and its subsidiaries (the “Company”) at December 31, 2014 and 2013, and the results of their operations and their cash flows for each of the three years in the period ended December 31, 2014 in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America. In addition, in our opinion, the financial statement schedule listed in the accompanying index presents fairly, in all material respects, the information set forth therein when read in conjunction with the related consolidated financial statements. Also in our opinion, the Company maintained, in all material respects, effective internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2014, based on criteria established in Internal Control-Integrated Framework (2013 framework) issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission ("COSO"). The Company’s management is responsible for these financial statements and financial statement schedule, for maintaining effective internal control over financial reporting and for its assessment of the effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting, included in the accompanying Management’s Annual Report on Internal Control over Financial Reporting. Our responsibility is to express opinions on these financial statements, on the financial statement schedule, and on the Company’s internal control over financial reporting based on our integrated audits. We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audits to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement and whether effective internal control over financial reporting was maintained in all material respects. Our audits of the financial statements included examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements, assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, and evaluating the overall financial statement presentation.
 


















 


Our audit of internal control over financial reporting included obtaining an understanding of internal control over financial reporting, assessing the risk that a material weakness exists, and testing and evaluating the design and operating effectiveness of internal control based on the assessed risk. Our audits also included performing such other procedures as we considered necessary in the circumstances. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinions.
 
A company’s internal control over financial reporting is a process designed to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles. A company’s internal control over financial reporting includes those policies and procedures that (i) pertain to the maintenance of records that, in reasonable detail, accurately and fairly reflect the transactions and dispositions of the assets of the company; (ii) provide reasonable assurance that transactions are recorded as necessary to permit preparation of financial statements in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, and that receipts and expenditures of the company are being made only in accordance with authorizations of management and directors of the company; and (iii) provide reasonable assurance regarding prevention or timely detection of unauthorized acquisition, use, or disposition of the company’s assets that could have a material effect on the financial statements.
 
Because of its inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements. Also, projections of any evaluation of effectiveness to future periods are subject to the risk that controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or that the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate.
 
/s/ PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP
 
Hartford, Connecticut
 
February 19, 2015
 



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Consolidated Statement of Income
 
 
Year Ended December 31,
(in millions, except per share amounts)
2014

2013

2012

Net sales
$
3,359.4

$
3,183.9

$
3,044.4

Cost of goods sold
2,250.4

2,113.4

2,032.2

Gross profit
1,109.0

1,070.5

1,012.2

Selling & administrative expenses
591.6

562.9

540.4

Operating income
517.4

507.6

471.8

Interest expense
(31.2
)
(30.8
)
(30.8
)
Investment income
1.1

1.3

1.8

Other expense, net
(1.8
)
(4.3
)
(1.0
)
Total other expense
(31.9
)
(33.8
)
(30.0
)
Income before income taxes
485.5

473.8

441.8

Provision for income taxes
158.3

144.0

139.7

Net income
327.2

329.8

302.1

Less: Net income attributable to noncontrolling interest
1.9

3.3

2.4

NET INCOME ATTRIBUTABLE TO HUBBELL
$
325.3

$
326.5

$
299.7

Earnings per share
 

 

 

Basic
$
5.51

$
5.51

$
5.05

Diluted
$
5.48

$
5.47

$
5.00

See notes to consolidated financial statements.
 
 
 
 
 

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Consolidated Statement of Comprehensive Income
 
 
Year Ended December 31,
(in millions)
2014

2013

2012

Net income
$
327.2

$
329.8

$
302.1

Other comprehensive (loss) income:
 

 

 

Foreign currency translation adjustments
(35.7
)
(15.0
)
8.3

Pension and post retirement benefit plans’ service costs and net actuarial (losses) gains, net of taxes of $33.9, $(38.7) and $(14.2)
(57.7
)
63.1

23.6

Unrealized loss on investments, net of taxes of $0.0, $0.2 and $0.1
(0.1
)
(0.3
)
(0.3
)
Unrealized gains (losses) on cash flow hedges, net of taxes of $(0.1), $(0.1) and $0.2
0.2

0.3

(0.3
)
Other comprehensive (loss) income
(93.3
)
48.1

31.3

Comprehensive income
233.9

377.9

333.4

Less: Comprehensive income attributable to noncontrolling interest
1.9

3.3

2.4

COMPREHENSIVE INCOME ATTRIBUTABLE TO HUBBELL
$
232.0

$
374.6

$
331.0

See notes to consolidated financial statements.                        
 



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Consolidated Balance Sheet      
 
 
At December 31,
(In millions, except share amounts)
2014

2013

ASSETS
 

 

Current Assets
 

 

Cash and cash equivalents
$
653.9

$
740.7

Short-term investments
7.8

10.1

Accounts receivable, net
469.8

440.9

Inventories, net
441.8

385.7

Deferred taxes and other
56.1

55.0

Total Current Assets
1,629.4

1,632.4

Property, Plant, and Equipment, net
401.2

377.1

Other Assets
 

 

Investments
44.1

35.8

Goodwill
874.7

800.4

Intangible assets, net
322.8

286.6

Other long-term assets
50.6

54.9

TOTAL ASSETS
$
3,322.8

$
3,187.2

LIABILITIES AND EQUITY
 

 

Current Liabilities
 

 

Short-term debt
$
1.4

$
0.3

Accounts payable
244.0

225.9

Accrued salaries, wages and employee benefits
76.0

74.7

Accrued insurance
47.8

41.8

Other accrued liabilities
130.0

124.3

Total Current Liabilities
499.2

467.0

Long-term Debt
597.6

597.2

Other Non-Current Liabilities
290.3

208.2

TOTAL LIABILITIES
1,387.1

1,272.4

Commitments and Contingencies (see Note 15)




Hubbell Shareholders’ Equity
 

 

Common stock, par value $.01
 

 

Class A - Authorized 50,000,000 shares, outstanding 7,167,506 and 7,167,506 shares
0.1

0.1

Class B - Authorized 150,000,000 shares, outstanding 51,328,974 and 52,005,492 shares
0.5

0.5

Additional paid-in capital
146.7

236.6

Retained earnings
1,944.1

1,740.2

Accumulated other comprehensive loss
(164.3
)
(71.0
)
Total Hubbell Shareholders’ Equity
1,927.1

1,906.4

Noncontrolling interest
8.6

8.4

Total Equity
1,935.7

1,914.8

TOTAL LIABILITIES AND EQUITY
$
3,322.8

$
3,187.2

See notes to consolidated financial statements.                
 


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Consolidated Statement of Cash Flows
 
 
Year Ended December 31,
(In millions)
2014

2013

2012

Cash Flows from Operating Activities
 

 

 

Net income
$
327.2

$
329.8

$
302.1

Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash provided by operating activities:
 

 

 

Depreciation and amortization
79.2

70.6

66.8

Deferred income taxes
30.3

13.3

27.5

Stock-based compensation
16.4

14.3

15.8

Tax benefit on stock-based awards
(9.2
)
(8.4
)
(15.6
)
(Gain) loss on sale of assets
(1.3
)
0.2

0.4

Changes in assets and liabilities, net of acquisitions:
 
 

 

Increase in accounts receivable
(17.8
)
(30.9
)
(1.8
)
Increase in inventories
(46.9
)
(25.9
)
(11.8
)
Increase (decrease) in current liabilities
20.0

1.7

(31.7
)
Changes in other assets and liabilities, net
15.4

15.8

20.7

Contributions to qualified defined benefit pension plans
(23.5
)
(3.2
)
(22.6
)
Other, net
1.7

4.5

(0.7
)
NET CASH PROVIDED BY OPERATING ACTIVITIES
391.5

381.8

349.1

Cash Flows from Investing Activities
 
 

 

Capital expenditures
(60.3
)
(58.8
)
(49.1
)
Acquisitions, net of cash acquired
(183.8
)
(96.5
)
(90.7
)
Receipt of escrow funds from acquisition


6.8

Purchases of available-for-sale investments
(17.6
)
(11.1
)
(9.5
)
Proceeds from sales of available-for-sale investments
12.1

10.5

19.4

Proceeds from disposition of assets
6.0

3.4

4.8

Other, net
1.0

1.4

2.2

NET CASH USED IN INVESTING ACTIVITIES
(242.6
)
(151.1
)
(116.1
)
Cash Flows from Financing Activities
 
 

 

Issuance of short-term debt
2.0

0.4

0.2

Payment of short-term debt
(0.8
)
(0.1
)
(3.1
)
Payment of dividends
(121.2
)
(109.5
)
(122.3
)
Payment of dividends to noncontrolling interest
(1.7
)
(1.5
)
(1.3
)
Proceeds from exercise of stock options
2.4

2.4

24.8

Tax benefit on stock-based awards
9.2

8.4

15.6

Acquisition of common shares
(105.5
)
(31.0
)
(75.6
)
NET CASH USED IN FINANCING ACTIVITIES
(215.6
)
(130.9
)
(161.7
)
Effect of foreign currency exchange rate changes on cash and cash equivalents
(20.1
)
(4.1
)
4.1

Increase in cash and cash equivalents
(86.8
)
95.7

75.4

Cash and cash equivalents, beginning of year
740.7

645.0

569.6

Cash and cash equivalents, end of year
$
653.9

$
740.7

$
645.0

See notes to consolidated financial statements.
 


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Consolidated Statement of Changes in Equity
 
 
For the Three Years Ended December 31, 2014, 2013 and 2012
(In millions, except per
share amounts)
Class A
Common
Stock
Class B
Common
Stock
Additional
Paid-in
Capital
Retained
Earnings
Accumulated
Other
Comprehensive
Income (Loss)
Total Hubbell
Shareholders'
Equity
Non-
controlling
interest
BALANCE AT December 31, 2011
$
0.1

$
0.5

$
294.2

$
1,323.4

$
(150.4
)
$
1,467.8

$
5.7

Net income
 

 

 

299.7

 

299.7

2.4

Other comprehensive (loss) income
 

 

 

 

31.3

31.3

 

Stock-based compensation
 

 

15.4

 

 

15.4

 

Exercise of stock options
 

 

24.8

 

 

24.8

 

Income tax windfall from stock-based awards, net
 

 

15.1

 

 

15.1

 

Acquisition/surrender of common shares
 

 

(93.1
)
 

 

(93.1
)
 

Cash dividends declared ($1.68 per Class A & B shares)
 

 

 

(99.8
)
 

(99.8
)
 

Dividends to noncontrolling interest
 

 

 

 

 

 

(1.4
)
BALANCE AT December 31, 2012
0.1

0.5

256.4

1,523.3

(119.1
)
1,661.2

6.7

Net income
 

 

 

326.5

 

326.5

3.3

Other comprehensive (loss) income
 

 

 

 

48.1

48.1

 

Stock-based compensation
 

 

13.5

 

 

13.5

 

Exercise of stock options
 

 

2.4

 

 

2.4

 

Income tax windfall from stock-based awards, net
 

 

8.4

 

 

8.4

 

Acquisition/surrender of common shares
 

 

(44.1
)
 

 

(44.1
)
 

Cash dividends declared ($1.85 per Class A & B shares)
 

 

 

(109.6
)
 

(109.6
)
 

Dividends to noncontrolling interest
 

 

 

 

 

 

(1.6
)
BALANCE AT December 31, 2013
0.1

0.5

236.6

1,740.2

(71.0
)
1,906.4

8.4

Net income
 

 

 

325.3

 

325.3

1.9

Other comprehensive (loss) income
 

 

 

 

(93.3
)
(93.3
)
 

Stock-based compensation
 

 

15.8

 

 

15.8

 

Exercise of stock options
 

 

2.4

 

 

2.4